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[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: December 5, 1973
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Gibson Well- - Souvenir Photograph]

Description: This picture appears to be a souvenir photograph of the Gibson Well drinking pavilion and park, one of the earliest mineral water supply spots in Mineral Wells. It grew into one of the larger parks and pavilions in town. The gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed here every quarter-hour (from 1905 to 1909) on their journey to and from Lake Pinto. The Crazy Industries had acquired the property by 1938, and it became known as Crazy Park, a beautiful botanical park. The mineral water industry became a victim of the FDA and the wartime activities during World War II. As a result, the mineral water pavilions, along with other parts of the local health industry, died a slow death. The First Christian Church now occupies the site of the Gibson pavilion.
Date: 1910?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Apparatus for Hoisting Liquids from Wells.

Description: Patent for an “apparatus for raising liquid from wells by means of a compressed fluid, such as air or other vapors or gas“ (lines 9-12). The apparatus leaves liquid from the well under normal pressure during hoisting or pumping, and allows for varying amounts of liquid to be extracted.
Date: October 28, 1913
Creator: McCall, Duncan D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sangcura Sprudel Wells

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Drinking Pavilion was originally located at 800 NW Second Avenue. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, the porches enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The Crazy Water bottling plant was built on this site in 1919. The rooming house that was the former Sangcura-Sprudel drinking Pavilion burned on December 5, 1973, just five minutes before Mineral Wells' annual Christmas Parade was scheduled to start.
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells

Description: A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]

Description: An early picture (probably taken from a newspaper) of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." (Please see the picture one down, but one, for a better view of it.) This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex"
Date: 1905?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The "Gibson Well" Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: Shown here is a picture of the first Gibson Well drinking pavilion. Located in the 700 block of what is now NW 2nd Avenue, it was one of the first drinking pavilions in the city. An expanded pavilion replaced the one in this picture, and it became one of the more popular social gathering places in town. The Christian Church now [2008] occupies the entire city block on which the Gibson Well was located.
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Crazy Water Well--1974]

Description: What is said to be the original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is supposed to be the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "Cured" her dementia. Stories are in conflict about how many women there were--and whether the water actually cured any of them of epilepsy. Subsequent analysis of the water refuted a rumor that there was any Lithium was in it. Cutter's "Guide to Mineral Wells" (first published in 1893, re-printed in 2007) suggests that the first well was "[N]ear the center of one of the business blocks of the city, back of the hardware store of L. B . Kidwell. It is now out of use and, we learned, to be filled up." Although not used for years, this well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974."
Date: March 24, 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Air Compressor for Deep Well Pumps.

Description: Patent for a new and improved air-compressor. This design "relates to improvements in air-compressing mechanism for the purpose of pumping for forcing from deep wells and performing similar work; and it consists in the construction and arrangement of a larger and smaller air-cylinder, and the combination therewith of mechanism to force the air from the larger into the smaller cylinder to increase the air-pressure in the latter" (lines 22-30).
Date: August 2, 1887
Creator: Adams, John R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Apparatus for Boring Artesian Wells.

Description: Patent for a new and improved artesian-well borer. This design "has for its object to furnish a combination tool which will wear or cut the harder grades or rock frequently met with in boring wells of this class, and also to furnish a tool which will be harder than the common steel too or auger, thereby dispensing with the necessity of taking out and sharpening" (lines 13-20). It consists in "[a] fluted hemispherical mass of corundum for boring Artesian wells, said mass being provided with cutting-edges which extend from the apex to the base, [and] a metallic core embedded within the mass" (lines 16-20).
Date: April 5, 1892
Creator: Brown, Frank O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Artesian Well Borer.

Description: Patent for a new and improved artesian-well borer. This design "will be actuated by the weight of the connecting-rods and sink-wells in rock, gravel, earth, or sand without the use of water" (lines 13-16). It consists "[i]n an earth or rock auger, the combination, with a tube and a shank reciprocating in said tube and adapted to operate the auger, of dogs adapted to be projected through the tube by the reciprocation of the shank to engage the well-casing and hold the said tube from rotary movement" (lines 62-68).
Date: January 20, 1891
Creator: Logan, Thomas H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Jerry Wells Speaking into Microphone]

Description: Photograph of Jerry Wells speaking into a microphone on a platform. He stands in front of a sign that may read "Jerry Wells National Sale." This photograph was taken either in Denton, Texas or at Windy Hill Farm in Murphy, Texas.
Date: unknown
Creator: Dalco Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Oscar Wells and Tommy Wells by his Hudson

Description: Photograph of Oscar Wells and his son Tommy standing by his Hudson. The car is an early 1920s model with a four-cylinder motor and three-speed transmission. Oscar wears cowboy boots and a hat. He lived and worked on the Bright Ranch. His son wears a cap and stands on the running board of the car. This photo was included in a research paper by David Newton for an American History class at Marfa High School in 1971.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marfa Public Library

[The Lynch Cabins]

Description: A drawing of the Lynch cabins, done by Jarmon Alvis Lynch, grandson of James Alvis Lynch. The drawing says "Alvis Lynch 77" in the bottom right-hand corner. The picture was apparently done from memory. The original mineral water discovery well is in the right foreground, with a windlass for drawing water. "Judge" Lynch and his family did not arrive in Millsap Valley until Christmas 1879. Note the tents in the right background. H. M. Berry, Mineral Wells' first teacher, noted in an article that when the reputation for the curative powers of the water spread, the area looked like "an army on the move" with health-seekers temporarily camping in tents until housing could be built for them.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Pump.

Description: Patent for a "pump for effectively pumping oil or quicksand from wells troubled with quicksand." (Lines 8-10) Includes instructions and illustrations.
Date: March 30, 1897
Creator: Wintz, James Philip
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department