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[Houston skyline]

Description: Photograph of the Houston skyline. The Esperson building is the tallest building on the right and the Gulf Building is the tall building located to its left.
Date: [1929..]
Creator: Williams, Byrd M. (Byrd Moore), III
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Construction near Purina plant]

Description: Photograph of me working construction near the Purina plant in Fort Worth, Texas. There are men seated at the edge of the dug out section while three men are working down in the ditch. There is a truck parked next to a machine billowing black smoke.
Date: 1920
Creator: Williams, Byrd M. (Byrd Moore), Jr.
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Letter from Irene Biffle Williams to Byrd Williams, Jr., August 23, 1923]

Description: Letter from Irene Biffle Williams to her husband Byrd Williams, Jr., discussing the need for money to pay for their sons, B. M. (Byrd, III) and John to have their tonsils taken out, as well as for John's circumcision. The letter also delves into their marital troubles as Byrd spends too much time away while working and gambling.
Date: August 23, 1923
Creator: Williams, Irene Biffle
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Audience in Auditorium, Administration Building, ca. 1926]

Description: Photograph of a large audience seated in the Auditorium, Administration Building, ca. 1926. Seen from the stage, the people in the very front sit on folding chairs while the crowd fills the main floor and balcony area. Photograph is a photograph of a photograph. Constructed in 1923-24, the Administration Building was renamed the Auditorium Building in 1957 after the construction of what is now called the Hurley Administration Building.
Date: 1926~
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Audience in Auditorium, Administration Building, ca. 1926]

Description: Photograph of a large audience seated in the Auditorium, Administration Building, ca. 1926. Seen from the stage, the people in the very front sit on folding chairs while the crowd fills the main floor and balcony area. Photograph is a photograph of a photograph. Constructed in 1923-24, the Administration Building was renamed the Auditorium Building in 1957 after the construction of what is now called the Hurley Administration Building.
Date: 1926~
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Item 2: World War I (4)

Description: This is the 2nd of 5 reels in the US Army Signal Corp produced film, "America Goes Over," documenting the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The film was produced in 1918 and this print was likely produced ca. 1927. The footage begins with American troops marching through rainy streets in France, then taking wagons on French roads and gearing up for the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. The footage then shows American guns firing the first shots of the 47-day Meuse-Argonne battle, an artillery observer being launched into the air in a balloon with an early radio, then being shot down by planes and parachuting to safety while anti-aircraft guns shoot at the plane with the balloon bursting into flames afterward. The battle scenes include early night-time battle footage, artillery fire, a Renault FT-17 Tank, and various troop movement. As the troops move into the Argonne Forest the footage shows various small conflicts, the assessment of a wounded soldier, dead lying in the fields, and villages in ruins. The footage also features Generals Foch and Pershing giving an update, troops in downtime, prisoners marching, Pershing pinning medals on American troops, troops playing with a lion cub, milking a goat, dressing as women and dancing, and gambling entertainment.
Date: 1927
Creator: US Army Signal Corp
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Item 5: World War I (3)

Description: This film is the 3rd of 5 reels in the US Army Signal Corp produced film, "America Goes Over," documenting the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The film was produced in 1918 and this print was likely produced ca. 1927. The footage opens with radio operators working in the trenches, various scenes of battle planning, artillery firing, wounded soldiers being removed from a battlefield and the dead left behind. The film then moves to the American forces move toward Soissons, crossing the Marne, and taking Chateau Thierry. The American troops are seen eating, washing, getting haircuts, and welcoming more troops and supplies from ships from the United States. Footage shows the city of supplies at Gievres, an industrial cooking demonstration, and General Pershing writing commands. The film then moves into the opening of the Saint-Mihiel Offensive of 12 Sep 1918 with many artillery scenes, Renault tanks, soldiers cutting barbed wire at dawn, and troops running out of bunkers to fight. An airplane dogfight is captured on film from this battle, ending with the German pilot being shot down and taken prisoner. Troops are then shown digging in Howitzers, crossing enemy lines, surveying the German dead, helping wounded American troops off the field, resting, then going back the next day. In the German fortifications they find a dog used for sending messages. Troops are seen eating, feeding villagers, and marching German prisoners through the streets. The footage then moves to show the American and Australian troops marching through the Hindenburg line together. The footage ends showing the St. Quentin Canal Tunnel, and King Albert and Queen Elisabeth of Belgium watch the American troops marching.
Date: 1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections