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[Portrait of Ida Caldwell McFaddin on Donkey]

Description: Portrait of Ida Caldwell McFaddin (Mrs. W.P.H. McFaddin) sitting on a donkey outside of a log cabin, with rocky terrain in the background. A typed note below the photo says "Climbing the mountain, Mineral Wells," and a handwritten note says "Mother on Mineral Wells Texas, Mrs. W.P.H. McFaddin."
Date: unknown
Partner: McFaddin-Ward House Museum

[Photograph of L. J. Varnell, Jr., Mayor of Mineral Wells]

Description: Photograph of L. J. Varnell, Jr., Mayor of Mineral Wells. Mr. Varnell is wearing a dark suit and tie and standing or sitting against a light backdrop. On the back of the photograph are a stamp giving the Boyce-Ditto Public Library address and handwritten notes, including one that identifies the photo's subject, and a stamp with the photographer's information.
Date: unknown
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Souvenir Photo from Mineral Wells]

Description: Photograph of nine people outside under some trees. There is a note in the bottom left corner that says "[sic] A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas." On the back are advertisements for the Jericho Photo Company and the Texas and Pacific Railway.
Date: unknown
Partner: The Grace Museum

Wrench.

Description: Patent for a new and improved wrench, which is especially useful for machinists. The improvement to existing wrench technology is present in positions where a thin jaw wrench is necessary and in removing parts upon which an ordinary nut wrench, even thin jawed, would act.
Date: May 6, 1913
Creator: Seale, Jefferson, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Table Cloth Clasp.

Description: Patent for table cloth clasp, "which may be readily detachably connected with the table top, will securely hold the table cloth in place thereon, and will be entirely concealed by the table cloth" (lines 14-17).
Date: February 14, 1913
Creator: Hatzfeld, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

St. Nicholas Hotel

Description: A note with the picture states: The original picture was re-done and re-named the "Delaware Hotel." This picture appears on page 104 in "Time Was..." The building was located at 316 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. It was eventually destroyed by fire. A report in the 1911 Weatherford Herald states that an opera house would be built to replace the "Auditorium"--probably the Chautauqua building nearby. The opera house was never built, and the Chautauqua building survived the hotel.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Rock School Bell]

Description: The "Little Rock School" was Mineral Wells' first public school, built in 1884. The school bell, mounted in a bell tower atop the building, called students to class by ringing 10 minutes before school time; and again at the beginning of the class period. It is now currently on display at the Little Rock School Museum, dedicated to preserving the history of Mineral Wells. This picture is found on page 172 of A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, with a notation: "The original bell for the old 'Rock School' was found years later in the water department warehouse. R. L. (Pete) Cook is on the left and Derrell Stricklin is on the right."
Date: unknown
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Thompson-Cunningham Home

Description: This picture is, apparently, a page distributed during a 1975 "Tour of Homes." It is best viewed and read when enlarged on the computer screen. The picture is a copy of the one used on page 141 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. This house, at 215 NE 2nd Street, is Queen Anne style, spindle work sub-type. The copy refers to a "Cupola" on the house, but cupolas were not a part of Queen Anne architecture. The house seems to have, however, a truncated tower. It was restored in 2006 by Bill Pratt, Jr.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Unloading Grain From Box Cars]

Description: This picture depicts men unloading grain from box cars at the Mineral Wells railroad yards into horse-drawn wagons. During the days if the Great Depression years of the 1930's, grain and cotton were the principal cash crops of farmers around Mineral Wells, and the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwest) Railroad was a prime shipper of the crops to market. This photograph is featured on page 92 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells," second edition.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Kingsley

Description: The Kingsley was built on the side of East Mountain around NW 7th Street, and was eventually destroyed by fire. The legend reads "The Kingsley, Mineral Wells Texas." This photograph appears on page 102 of A. F. Weaver's pictorial history book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." Second Edition, 1988.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

U.S. O. Club, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: The only information available about this photograph is solely the legend on it, identifying it as the U.S.O. Club of Mineral Wells, Texas. It is obviously a drawing of a future building, but further details in regard to this club would be welcome.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Piedmont Hotel [The First Piedmont Hotel]

Description: We have here a picture (perhaps an early photograph) of the first Piedmont Hotel,where the Baker Hotel Garage sits presently [2015]. It was built by a colonel R.W. Duke of Weatherford, Texas. He purchased the block and built this frame hotel. Later on, a large brick building was put in its place. This photograph (which was apparently taken from "Cutter's Guide to Mineral Wells") appears on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," Second Edition, 1988.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Piedmont Hotel - [The Second Piedmont Hotel]

Description: This photograph occurs on page 104 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells" (first edition) by A. F. Weaver. The caption reads: "The Second Piedmont Hotel located on 2nd Avenue [sic] and East Hubbard was demolished to give room for the Baker Hotel Garage. It was used as an office for the Army Engineers during the construction of Possum Kingdom Dam." This hotel was probably located on the same site as the first Piedmont Hotel, which was built by a Colonel Duke of Weatherford, Texas, (a two story wooden structure) a picture of which is also on page 104 of the same edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Guest Room in the Baker Hotel]

Description: This photograph shows a guest room in the Baker Hotel, when it was operating. Please note the corner sofa, shag carpet, round coffee-table. Please note also the smoking stand at one end of the sofa--an amenity not encountered in modern hotel rooms. The decor suggests the late 1950's or the early 1960's. It is said that the door of the room had an apparatus in it that automatically turned off the lights and the fan when the key was turned in it. The method used has not yet [2016] been fathomed. "Smart" keys (and computers that took their advice) were still in the future, but it was within the technology of the period to accomplish such wonders as rooms that automatically came to life hen the door was opened.. It is conjectured that a mercury switch in the door accomplished the feat.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Baker Hotel Grounds' View]

Description: Here is a view of Baker Hotel from across its grounds. The style of the hotel is Spanish Colonial Revival, which William Gross, Jr. states in his book "Mineral Wells History: A Sampler" was a favorite of Mr. T. B.Baker. Note: There are umbrellas around swimming pool, but the swimming pool itself is out of view. Foliage includes Canna flowers and cedar trees. An unidentified woman and child are in foreground. The Baker Hotel had an ill-starred opening, as it occurred only weeks after the infamous stock market crash of 1929. The marketing of Crazy Crystals had been blamed for the distress, because fewer people needed to make the trek to Mineral Wells for the waters. They could produce the same thing in their own homes. However, no proof of that assertion has been found, and the general malaise of the Great Depression probably should be blamed. The owners of the Baker Hotel filed for bankruptcy In 1932. On April 30, 1963, Earl Baker formally closed the hotel. The property went under the hammer that August. The rest is history.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Baker Hotel at Night]

Description: This picture shows the Baker--in its great days--at night. According to William O. Gross, Jr. ("Mineral wells, Texas: A Sampler, 1997) the hotel is properly named "Hotel Mineral Wells", the name "Baker" refers to the Baker Hotel Corporation of San Antonio, Texas, which operated nine hotels at the time. Legend has it that a female guest jumped to her death. Her ghost is supposed to be resident in the building, but substantial evidence for the existence of the ghost remains to this date [2014] lacking. A legend on the front of the photograph states that it was colorized by A. F. Weaver in 1940.
Date: 1940
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Bank of Mineral Wells

Description: The Bank of Mineral Wells, the first of its kind, was located at 102 SE 1st Avenue. The quality of this picture is parlous: The upper story of the building appears to have been heavily retouched by an unknown hand.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Chautauqua Hall]

Description: This picture shows a side view of the Chautauqua Hall, once located on the side of Welcome Mountain, where the Jaycee Youth Center is now [2010] located (behind the Grand Theater.) It was taken, perhaps,in late spring or early summer--possibly in the morning. The photograph is featured in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 50. The building departed existence in 1912, after only about seven years of service. The Chautauqua movement began in 1874 in an eponymous town in New York (it is still there). It was conceived as a form of adult education, which featured a set of touring lectures. Before the advent of moving pictures and the radio, Chautauqua was immensely popular. For example, William Jennings Bryan (he of the famous "Cross of Gold" speech)--and other people--gave various lectures and orations at this Chautauqua hall. H.L. Mencken ("Prejudices:First Series", published in 1919) speaks disparagingly of "...oafish, witless buffoonishness [sic] of the chautauquas [sic] and the floor of Congress...." Mr. Mencken, though, had a reputation for disparaging everything (that was American) in his sight. This remark seems to be his only direct comment on the movement. He makes reference to Chautauqua only tangentially otherwise. One might surmise, therefore, that television (which supplanted Chautauqua) followed a parallel route in its later years.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Buffet Table]

Description: A buffet table, presumably in the Baker Hotel, is shown ready for guests (who are absent) to use it. Its opulence would reflect the quality of the hotel. The fact that the photograph is in color suggests that it was taken in the late twentieth century. The exact location of this buffet table is [2014] unknown. An ice sculpture of a sleigh and reindeer suggests a Christmas occasion. Further details are lacking.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library