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Cotton-Chopper.

Description: Patent for a cotton chopper, which "may be operated from either wheel" (lines 12-13).
Date: January 25, 1910
Creator: Stepleton, James T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seed-Planter

Description: Patent for a seed planter so that the distances between seeds can be changed from equidistant to a continuous row and vice versa and so that it can be adapted to sew both seeds and grains.
Date: December 25, 1888
Creator: Leamon, John B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thill-Coupling.

Description: Patent for a simple and inexpensive thill-coupling that "can be conveniently applied to any ordinary vehicle, which is arranged in such a way that rattling is positively prevented, and which, when the thills are dropped, permits them to be freely lifted from the coupling; also to a modified form of the device designed to prevent rattling only" (lines 12-18).
Date: December 25, 1894
Creator: Parker, Daniel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improvement in Cotton Feeders and Cleaners for Cotton-Gins.

Description: Patent for "devices for feeding seed-cotton to cotton-gins, and also, for cleaning the same preparatory to ginning; and it consists of a hopper having wires extending from side to side over a revolving toothed cylinder and a concave thrasher, and being made to reciprocate on a track by pinions on the ends of the thrasher-cylinder, working in double rack-bars, one in each side of the hopper, so contrived that the pinions run them over one way and under the other, making a simple and cheap mode of obtaining the motion." (Lines 6-18) Includes instructions and illustrations.
Date: July 25, 1876
Creator: Colquitt, George F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Col. Nicholas Copeland letter to Martin Bridgman, April 25, 1835]

Description: 1835 letter of Col. Nicholas Copeland to his son-in-law Martin Bridgman of Arkansas, enticing him to move to Texas. The letter discusses the price of land and cattle, as well as the profitability of crops such as cotton and corn. Copeland adds a note for Harry Currin, a free African-American, stating that Texas is a safe place to settle. His land grant (settlement & fortification) described in the letter was 25 miles west of the Trinity River just before crossing the Navasota River. This letter was written at Robbins' Ferry on the Old San Antonio Road at the crossing of the Trinity River (letters went east from there to be carried & put in the US mail system).
Date: April 25, 1835
Creator: Copeland, Nicholas
Partner: Other