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[News Clip: Ridgmar Square]

Description: Video footage from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas to accompany a story about plans for Ridgmar Square in Fort Worth. The story includes footage of an empty lot at Ridgmar Boulevard and Service Street and unidentified men and women looking at sketches and architectural models.
Date: May 29, 1964
Duration: 1 minute 44 seconds
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Main Building and baseball field at Rosewood Recreation Center]

Description: Photograph of Rosewood Recreation Center, showing the historic Bertram-Huppertz home which became the clubhouse and bath house once the park was established for black citizens. The City acquired the 1875 home of Rudolph Bertram, and adjacent land at 2300 Rosewood Avenue, from his daugheter Emmie Bertram Huppertz (Mrs. Charles Huppertz) in 1928, for the purpose of creating a segregated park for the African American community. The development included a swimming pool for Negros. A grand stone staircase was constructed next to the building by the Civil Works Administration (C. W. A.) in 1934, leading down to a baseball field. This view shows the side of the two-story stone house, designed by architect Joseph Sherwin, with two bay windows on the first floor. The stone steps and ball field are visible in the foreground.
Date: 1936
Creator: Bureau of Identification Photographic Lab., Austin
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Pan American Recreation Center Exterior]

Description: Photograph of exterior view of the Pan American Recreation Center. A car is parked in the parking lot near the entrance. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958.
Date: 196X
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Scholz Garten]

Description: Photograph of the exterior of Scholz Garten and Saengerrunde Hall. Cars are parked at the curb in front of the buildings.
Date: 1971
Creator: Hornberger, Carl
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Ariel view of Camp Swift including Headquarters, Post Finance Office, U. S. Post Office and north cantonment area]

Description: Photograph of an aerial view of Camp Swift Headquarters, Finance Building, U. S. Post Office and a portion of the north cantonment area. The long wooden buildings are arranged parallel to each other, with the two-story Headquarters building in the center and the one-story Finance and Post Office buildings to each side. A flag pole with flag is visible in the foreground, and the cantonment area buildings are in the background.
Date: 1942/1945
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Front view of Blackshear Elementary School, located at 1712 East 11th Street]

Description: Photograph of an oblique view of the front facade of Blackshear Elementary School, located at 1712 East 11th Street, which was constructed in 1936. A two story brick building with a flat roof, the school was named for Edward Lavernia Blackshear, a former administrative supervisor of Austin's African-American schools. The building is symetrically designed, with a central entrance. There are groups of 5 windows on the first and second floor, with decorative brickwork on the wall between the floors. The base of the building is lined with vegetation. In the lower right corner of the image, hands hold a chalk board sign that reads, "2-14 1-BLACKSHEAR".
Date: unknown
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Side view of Blackshear Elementary School, located at 1712 East 11th Street]

Description: Photograph of the side of Blackshear Elementary School, a two story brick building with a flat roof located at 1712 East 11th Street and constructed in 1936. The school was named for Edward Lavernia Blackshear, a former administrative supervisor of Austin's African-American schools. There are groups of 5 windows on the first and second floor, with decorative brickwork on the wall between the floors. A one-story entrance, with two sets of wooden double doors, sits to the left of the two-story section. To the right, hands hold a chalk board sign that reads, "2-14 1-BLACKSHEAR".
Date: unknown
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Back view of Blackshear Elementary School, located at 1712 East 11th Street]

Description: Photograph of the back of Blackshear Elementary School, which is located at 1712 East 11th Street and backs onto Lawson Lane and was constructed in 1936. A two story brick building with a flat roof, the school was named for Edward Lavernia Blackshear, a former administrative supervisor of Austin's African-American schools. The building is symetrically designed, with groups of windows on the first and second floors. In the lower right corner of the image, hands hold a chalk board sign that reads, "2-14 5-BLACKSHEAR". There is a wood frame building in the background with a 7-Up sign over the entrance. A street sign in the foreground reads Lawson Lane and what appears to be Botson Street.
Date: unknown
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Old Red Campus building, John T. Allan Campus of Stephen F. Austin High School]

Description: Photograph of Old Red Campus building, at the John T. Allan Campus of Stephen F. Austin High School, showing an oblique view of the front and side of the classical four-story building. The exterior walls of the first floor are constructed of stone and the upper three floors are dark brick. The front is symetrically arranged in three parts, with the central part inset from the outer parts. Porches stretch across the central part of the first and second floors, and a gable is centered above on the roof. There are punched windows on the upper floors of the front facade, while windows are ganged on the side facade. A portion of the facade, near the back of the building, has a curved wall. There is a three-story brick addition to the side of the building, and there are chute style fire escapes on both the main building and the addition. A parking lot lies to the front of the building, with several circa 1920s cars. A boy wearing knickers stands in the parking lot. The building was completed in 1900 from the plans of Burt McDonald and James Reily, and featured a domed rotunda. It was used as Austin High School until 1925, when it became the John T. Allan Junior High School. Classes were held here until 1956, when the school was destroyed by fire. A State of Texas Subject Marker was placed on the site in 1981 by the Texas Historical Commission.
Date: 1929/1930
Creator: Jordan-Ellison Photo Company
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Brownsville, Texas]

Description: Postcard of Brownsville, Texas in 1904. On the left side of the image buildings line a street with trees lining the right. Horse drawn carriages are visible on the street. Handwritten text on back reads "Brownsville, 1904".
Date: 1904
Partner: The University of Texas – Rio Grande Valley
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