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[Old Red Campus building, John T. Allan Campus of Stephen F. Austin High School]

Description: Photograph of Old Red Campus building, at the John T. Allan Campus of Stephen F. Austin High School, showing an oblique view of the front and side of the classical four-story building. The exterior walls of the first floor are constructed of stone and the upper three floors are dark brick. The front is symetrically arranged in three parts, with the central part inset from the outer parts. Porches stretch across the central part of the first and second floors, and a gable is centered above on the roof. There are punched windows on the upper floors of the front facade, while windows are ganged on the side facade. A portion of the facade, near the back of the building, has a curved wall. There is a three-story brick addition to the side of the building, and there are chute style fire escapes on both the main building and the addition. A parking lot lies to the front of the building, with several circa 1920s cars. A boy wearing knickers stands in the parking lot. The building was completed in 1900 from the plans of Burt McDonald and James Reily, and featured a domed rotunda. It was used as Austin High School until 1925, when it became the John T. Allan Junior High School. Classes were held here until 1956, when the school was destroyed by fire. A State of Texas Subject Marker was placed on the site in 1981 by the Texas Historical Commission.
Date: 1929/1930
Creator: Jordan-Ellison Photo Company
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Order Form for a Cast Aluminum Plaque]

Description: Order form from the Southwell Company for a cast aluminum plaque which will be the historic marker for the African American Cemetery in San Antonio, Texas. The text for the plaque was written by Mario Salas and the artwork drawn by Tony Perez.
Date: September 24, 2008
Creator: The Southwell Company
Partner: Private Collection of Mario Marcel Salas

Beulah Harriss Gymnasium historic marker is revealed

Description: Photograph of Elise Clements (left) and Melissa McGuire, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs, (right) standing on either side of the the Beulah Harriss Gym memorial plaque after removing the cloth that was covering it. Clements is wearing a Girl Scout sash and pins; an unientified person in the foreground is also wearing a patch jacket.
Date: March 14, 2017
Creator: Judkins, Julie
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Images of L.A.'s Real Treasure

Description: A newspaper clipping on the architecture in Los Angeles and how sometimes the buildings are used as links to the past. As part of "Mapping Boyle Heights," a Getty Research Institute endeavor, students are studying the cultures that were one practiced but have since disappeared from the communities.
Date: July 20, 1997
Creator: Los Angeles Times
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

President Neal Smatresk speaks at Beulah Harriss Gymnasium historic marker ceremony

Description: Photograph of UNT President Neal Smatresk speaking at the Beulah Harriss Gym memorial plaque dedication. He is standing on a sidewalk near the marker, which is covered in a black cloth with a green ribbon. Other people are partially visible in the foreground.
Date: March 14, 2017
Creator: Judkins, Julie
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
captions transcript

[News Clip: GOP Governor]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story.
Date: November 8, 1978, 10:00 p.m.
Duration: 2 minutes 11 seconds
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Historic Plaque, Jonathan Hamilton Baker

Description: Photograph of a historic marker in Palo Pinto, Texas. It reads: "Jonathan Hamilton Baker (July 13, 1832 - October 18, 1918). Virginia native Jonathan Hamilton "Ham" Baker came to Texas in 1858 with his brother G. W. Baker and his uncle Eli Young. Stricken by malaria while a teacher in Fort Worth, he later moved to Palo Pinto County where his uncle Frank Baker was homesteading. Here he opened a school in Palo Pinto, and soon after helped establish the town's first Methodist Church. In 1859 Baker was chosen to lead a company of local men organized to defend the area against Indian attacks. He first served under Capt. J. R. Baylor and later participated with Capt. Lawrence Sullivan Ross in the recovery of Cynthia Ann Parker, the white woman seized by Comanches in 1836. During the Civil War he served as leader of the home guard. Baker was also an open range cattleman, and in 1869 he began driving his herds to Kansas railheads. Active in local government, he served as Deputy Sheriff, Justice of the Peace, Deputy Postmaster and Clerk of the County and District. In 1890 he moved to Granbury, where he became a successful nurseryman. For over 60 years Baker kept a detailed diary, which now provides a thorough account of his distinguished life and the frontier of Texas. (1983)"
Date: May 2, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Courthouses of Palo Pinto County

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque about the courthouses of Palo Pinto County. It reads: "Palo Pinto County was created in 1856 and named for a creek south of here that was perhaps named by Spanish explorers of the Brazos River valley. The county seat of 320 acres was surveyed at its geographical center and was originally named Golconda. A court session in 1857 called for the first courthouse to be built of wood frame construction, with two doors and three windows. The contract was awarded to a bid of $300. Shortly after, in 1859, the town name was changed to Palo Pinto. In 1882, just after the Texas legislature allowed counties to issue bonds for new courthouses, a large sandstone structure was built. It cost $35,000 and exhibited second empire styling with a central clock tower. A two-story sandstone annex was added in 1906 and connected to the courthouse by an iron bridge. Sandstone for the buildings was quarried south of the city. In 1940 these buildings were demolished and a new courthouse was erected by Work Projects Administration workers. The reinforced-concrete structure featured subtle classical detail and was clad with some of the sandstone from the old buildings. It was completed in 1942 at a cost of $250,000. Texas Sesquicentennial 1836-1986."
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
captions transcript

[News Clip: Dealey Plaza]

Description: B-roll video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story.
Date: November 26, 1978, 10:00 p.m.
Duration: 1 minute 28 seconds
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Historic Plaque, Hartfield Building

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Hartfield Building. Charles A. Hartfield purchased the lot on this site in 1881. A noted area cook, he quickly established "Charley's Restaurant," which included a bakery and boardinghouse. Hartfield was so successful that he planned an elegant rock structure in which to house his business. Construction began in March 1884 amid a flurry of development in the area. Scottish stonemason Patrick McDonnell, who was responsible for much of the stonework on the new courthouse, was foreman for the Hartfield worksite. The project's scope proved too grand for Hartfield's finances, however, and in September of 1884 he sold the building to J. C. Lynch. Financially ruined, Hartfield was found dead within the year. Lynch sold his building in 1885 to three Albany businessmen: Max Blach, N. H. Burns and Sam Webb. Charles Hartfield's widow, Lettie Hartfield, joined them as an equal partner and the group completed the structure, probably using Charles Hartfield's original plans. The building was occupied over time by such businesses as a grocery, a general merchandise store, a bowling alley and an auto repair shop. The Albany Masonic Lodge began meeting in the structure as early as 1893, and it became known as "The Masonic Building" to local residents. Real Estate magnate L. H. Hill purchased the building in 1925, and the masonic lodge bought it in 1940. Damage from nesting bats caused part of the buildings limestone front to tumble into the street in 1954. The Masons took down the facade and rebuilt it with yellow brick. Sold again in 1996, the building was renovated and its facade reconstructed to reflect its former grandeur as one of Albany's finest early structures. (2000)"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Lt. Col. William E. Dyess

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Lt. Col. William E. Dyess, (August 9, 1916 - December 22, 1943) "A native of Albany, and a graduate of Albany HighSchool and John Tarleton Agricultural College, William Edwin Dyess was the son of Judge Richard T. and Hallie Graham Dyess. Trained as a pilot at Randolph Field, San Antonio, he led the 21st Pursuit Squadron of P-40s in the Phillipines, where he was when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in December 1941 and the U.S. entered Word War II. Dyess' actions against invading Japanese forces at Subic Bay, despite few operational planes, and his later role as infantry commander earned him a reputation for bravery and resourcefulness. Dyess was among the men captured at the fall of Bataan on April 9, 1942 and forced into the grueling death march. He survived the malnutrition, disease and torture that resulted in the loss of thousands of his comrades. Almost a year after their capture he and 11 other men escaped and made their way through hostile territory. Dyess reported to the U. S. War Department and Gen. Douglas MacArthur on enemy actions. Through his personal accounts of Japanese atrocities in the Chicago Tribune, he influenced world opinion on wartime brutalities. Promoted to Lt. Colonel, Dyess returned to Albany in November 1943 after recuperation and made an appearance at the football field on his way to California. Weeks later, he died when the P-38 he piloted crashed at Burbank. His body was returned to his hometown for burial. His wife, Marajen, published The Dyess Story (1944), a book of his accounts, and Albany Playwright Robert E. Nail, Jr., wrote Men of Bataan (1943), an acclaimed play based on his exploits. Dyess Air Force Base at Abilene was named in honor of Albany's much-decorated …
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
captions transcript

[News Clip: Old red courthouse]

Description: Video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, to accompany a news story.
Date: January 12, 1979, 5:00 p.m.
Duration: 1 minute 56 seconds
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Woman Placing Flowers at Marker]

Description: Photograph of a woman in a patterned dress placing flowers on the ground in front of a Texas historical marker about Texas Ranger Captain Will Wright in Wilson County, Texas. A crowd of women and children stand in the background.
Date: unknown
Partner: Wilson County Historical Society

[Barker-Huebinger House]

Description: Photograph of the exterior of the Barker-Huebinger House in Wilson County, Texas. Trees, a Texas Historical Commission plaque, a wrought iron fence, and two flags on a pole are visible in front of the building.
Date: unknown
Creator: Grammer, Shirley
Partner: Wilson County Historical Society
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