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[Two Men and a Woman by Church]

Description: Photograph of two unidentified men wearing dark suits and hats and a woman wearing a dark coat and hat standing in front of a monument with a church, trees, and another building visible in the background. The two men are standing in front of the monument and the woman is standing on the steps with a large palm tree behind her.
Date: 1915~
Partner: The University of Texas – Rio Grande Valley

[Man walking in snow before Ranger statue at Texas State Capitol building]

Description: Photograph of a man walking in the snow and carrying an umbrella to protect his uncovered head from snow flurries. He is in front of the Texas Ranger equestrian statue on the grounds of the Texas state capitol building. Light snow covers the sidewalk and ground, indicating this snowfall as the first.
Date: [1980..1989]
Creator: Y-Weekly Newspaper
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

Stephens County Courthouse, Historic Plaque

Description: Stephens County Courthouse. Stephens County's first courthouse, erected in 1872, was a small pine building with desks for county officials lining the walls. In 1883, a new three-story red stone courthouse with a tower replaced the original structure. Discover of oil in Breckenridge in the 1920s resulted in a dramatic increase in population that led to the need for a larger courthouse and jail. Voters approved a bond in June 1924 to build a new courthouse and architect David S. Castle of Abilene designed the building constructed in 1926. Although not occupied until December 1926, a grand dedication ceremony was held here on July 4, 1926. The porch and sandstone entryway from teh 1883 courthouse were retained and are located at the southeast end of the square. During the depression of the 1930s, the courthouse became a financial burden and was refinanced. The last payment was made in 1962, thirty-six years after its completion. The four-story Stephens County Courthouse is a fine local example of the classical revival style and features limestone construction, arched entry doors and monumental primary entry stairs rising to triple arched entry doors, with ten columns above. (1997).
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Jonathan Hamilton Baker

Description: Photograph of a historic marker in Palo Pinto, Texas. It reads: "Jonathan Hamilton Baker (July 13, 1832 - October 18, 1918). Virginia native Jonathan Hamilton "Ham" Baker came to Texas in 1858 with his brother G. W. Baker and his uncle Eli Young. Stricken by malaria while a teacher in Fort Worth, he later moved to Palo Pinto County where his uncle Frank Baker was homesteading. Here he opened a school in Palo Pinto, and soon after helped establish the town's first Methodist Church. In 1859 Baker was chosen to lead a company of local men organized to defend the area against Indian attacks. He first served under Capt. J. R. Baylor and later participated with Capt. Lawrence Sullivan Ross in the recovery of Cynthia Ann Parker, the white woman seized by Comanches in 1836. During the Civil War he served as leader of the home guard. Baker was also an open range cattleman, and in 1869 he began driving his herds to Kansas railheads. Active in local government, he served as Deputy Sheriff, Justice of the Peace, Deputy Postmaster and Clerk of the County and District. In 1890 he moved to Granbury, where he became a successful nurseryman. For over 60 years Baker kept a detailed diary, which now provides a thorough account of his distinguished life and the frontier of Texas. (1983)"
Date: May 2, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Courthouses of Palo Pinto County

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque about the courthouses of Palo Pinto County. It reads: "Palo Pinto County was created in 1856 and named for a creek south of here that was perhaps named by Spanish explorers of the Brazos River valley. The county seat of 320 acres was surveyed at its geographical center and was originally named Golconda. A court session in 1857 called for the first courthouse to be built of wood frame construction, with two doors and three windows. The contract was awarded to a bid of $300. Shortly after, in 1859, the town name was changed to Palo Pinto. In 1882, just after the Texas legislature allowed counties to issue bonds for new courthouses, a large sandstone structure was built. It cost $35,000 and exhibited second empire styling with a central clock tower. A two-story sandstone annex was added in 1906 and connected to the courthouse by an iron bridge. Sandstone for the buildings was quarried south of the city. In 1940 these buildings were demolished and a new courthouse was erected by Work Projects Administration workers. The reinforced-concrete structure featured subtle classical detail and was clad with some of the sandstone from the old buildings. It was completed in 1942 at a cost of $250,000. Texas Sesquicentennial 1836-1986."
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Monument to Ledbetter Salt Works

Description: Granite monument. "Ledbetter Salt Works C. S. A. Located 8 mi. southwest on Salt Prong. Hubbard Creek, discovered 1861 by trail drivers. W. H. Ledbetter began extensive development of deposits in 1862. With increased Civil War demand for salt, a large furnace was built, kettles and materials for refining were brought from East Texas by wagon. Salt in large quantities was furnished Confederate troops west of the Mississippi, State Militia, area ranches and towns. Smoking or salting were only ways to preserve meat. When South levied a meat tithe, salt vital to cure bacon for military"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Hartfield Building

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Hartfield Building. Charles A. Hartfield purchased the lot on this site in 1881. A noted area cook, he quickly established "Charley's Restaurant," which included a bakery and boardinghouse. Hartfield was so successful that he planned an elegant rock structure in which to house his business. Construction began in March 1884 amid a flurry of development in the area. Scottish stonemason Patrick McDonnell, who was responsible for much of the stonework on the new courthouse, was foreman for the Hartfield worksite. The project's scope proved too grand for Hartfield's finances, however, and in September of 1884 he sold the building to J. C. Lynch. Financially ruined, Hartfield was found dead within the year. Lynch sold his building in 1885 to three Albany businessmen: Max Blach, N. H. Burns and Sam Webb. Charles Hartfield's widow, Lettie Hartfield, joined them as an equal partner and the group completed the structure, probably using Charles Hartfield's original plans. The building was occupied over time by such businesses as a grocery, a general merchandise store, a bowling alley and an auto repair shop. The Albany Masonic Lodge began meeting in the structure as early as 1893, and it became known as "The Masonic Building" to local residents. Real Estate magnate L. H. Hill purchased the building in 1925, and the masonic lodge bought it in 1940. Damage from nesting bats caused part of the buildings limestone front to tumble into the street in 1954. The Masons took down the facade and rebuilt it with yellow brick. Sold again in 1996, the building was renovated and its facade reconstructed to reflect its former grandeur as one of Albany's finest early structures. (2000)"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Lt. Col. William E. Dyess

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Lt. Col. William E. Dyess, (August 9, 1916 - December 22, 1943) "A native of Albany, and a graduate of Albany HighSchool and John Tarleton Agricultural College, William Edwin Dyess was the son of Judge Richard T. and Hallie Graham Dyess. Trained as a pilot at Randolph Field, San Antonio, he led the 21st Pursuit Squadron of P-40s in the Phillipines, where he was when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in December 1941 and the U.S. entered Word War II. Dyess' actions against invading Japanese forces at Subic Bay, despite few operational planes, and his later role as infantry commander earned him a reputation for bravery and resourcefulness. Dyess was among the men captured at the fall of Bataan on April 9, 1942 and forced into the grueling death march. He survived the malnutrition, disease and torture that resulted in the loss of thousands of his comrades. Almost a year after their capture he and 11 other men escaped and made their way through hostile territory. Dyess reported to the U. S. War Department and Gen. Douglas MacArthur on enemy actions. Through his personal accounts of Japanese atrocities in the Chicago Tribune, he influenced world opinion on wartime brutalities. Promoted to Lt. Colonel, Dyess returned to Albany in November 1943 after recuperation and made an appearance at the football field on his way to California. Weeks later, he died when the P-38 he piloted crashed at Burbank. His body was returned to his hometown for burial. His wife, Marajen, published The Dyess Story (1944), a book of his accounts, and Albany Playwright Robert E. Nail, Jr., wrote Men of Bataan (1943), an acclaimed play based on his exploits. Dyess Air Force Base at Abilene was named in honor of Albany's much-decorated …
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Panhandle Boys monument]

Description: Photograph of a monument in honor of the "Panhandle Boys" standing outside of The Amarillo Municipal Auditorium. The text on the base of the monument reads, "IN HONOR OF THE PANHANDLE BOYS OF THE WORLD WAR. ERECTED BY LLANO ESTACADO CHAPTER, DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. DEDICATED ARMISTICE DAY 1928." The statue has since been relocated to Ellwood Park in Amarillo, TX.
Date: [1928..1966]
Creator: Williams, Byrd M. (Byrd Moore), III
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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