Search Results

[Awaiting the Train]

Description: Copy negative of citizens of Jacksonville awaiting the arrival of President William Howard Taft by train at the I. & G. N. railroad station. The mayor, M. L. "Bud" Earle, stands second from the right. With him are Civil War veterans, many of whom wear ribbon badges.
Date: December 5, 1987
Creator: Cherokee County Historical Society
Partner: Cherokee County Historical Commission

[Business District]

Description: Copy negative of a street scene in Jacksonville's business district. Stores on the right side of the street are, from front to back, Ragsdale Brothers General Mdse., John H. Bolton Drug Store, J. L. Brown Department Store, Brown & Dixon Dry Goods, Gragard Bros. & Co. Hardware, and First State Bank. The large building on the far right is a cotton mill, and the Cotton Belt Railroad station is opposite it.
Date: December 5, 1987
Creator: Cherokee County Historical Society
Partner: Cherokee County Historical Commission

[Early Jacksonville Business District]

Description: Copy negative of Jacksonville's business district prior to 1917. The long building to the left was the Spear House and then the Pearl Hotel. The tall building in the center foreground was the first home of the First National Bank. A windmill and water tank can be seen on the far right. The Union Baptist Church is on the left, while the Benson Chapel Methodist is on the right. At the far upper right is the Ragsdale home. The building in front of the hotel was the first home of the International & Great Northern Railroad station.
Date: November 19, 1988
Creator: Cherokee County Historical Society
Partner: Cherokee County Historical Commission

[Dallas Passenger Depot]

Description: The Texas and Pacific Railway's Dallas passenger depot located on the south side of Pacific Avenue t the intersection of Lamar Street. This depot was in service until the Dallas Union Terminal was opened in the autumn of 1916.
Date: unknown
Partner: Museum of the American Railroad

[Rails at Jamaica Station]

Description: Long Island Rail Road's Jamaica Station, looking west toward New York, October 21, 1970. Passenger trains run through this station on an average of one every thirty seconds during peak periods of commuter travel. This is one of the world's busiest rail terminals. Note the outside paralleling third rail beside the respective tracks which provides electrical energy. Trains are powered from 650-volt Direct Current. Two-thirds of all passenger trains on the Long Island Rail Road operate in electrified territory.
Date: unknown
Partner: Museum of the American Railroad

[Grand Central Terminal in New York City]

Description: Photograph of Grand Central Terminal, New York, May 1943. Facing south on 42nd Street, the building sits squarely in the middle of Park Avenue and motor traffic goes around it by means of two elevated roadways running from 41st Street to 46th Street. The terminal has 123 tracks, 66 on the upper level and 57 on the lower. The upper level has 18.8 miles of track and the lower 14.9 miles making a total of 33.7 miles of railroad track in the terminal and its yard. There are 31 platform tracks on the upper level and 17 on the lower. Of these 48 platform tracks, 11 are loop tracks and 37 are stub end.
Date: 1943
Creator: Nowak, Ed
Partner: Museum of the American Railroad

Building Exterior

Description: Copy negative of the new T. & P. R. R. Station. The train station is brick. There are several people visible along with a few wagons and an electric pole as well as railroad tracks. Text surrounding the photograph reads "The Abilene Independent Telephone and Telegraph Company of which Gus H. Klotz of Abilene is Local Manager, in addition to its central district office in Abilene now has several private exchanges in and near the County each one with a large list of patrons; as for instance at Buffalo Gap, Hamby, Tuscola, Patosi, Nugent, Iberis, Dudley, Sambo, Delk, Clyde and Elmdale through which prompt service is had between the people in all sections of the county, as well as with those near the County line both south and east." Another section of text reads "...buildings with a united seating capacity of about 5,500 persons, have recently been erected at a cost of about $140,000, one by the St. Paul Methodist, one by the First Baptist and one by the Central Presbyterian church of the United States of America. Abilene is essentially a church loving city, and its people... Practically all the denominations represented in the state are represented in Abilene, as will be shown by the following memoranda, the names being alphabetically arranged for the convenience of the readers of this publication:"
Date: unknown
Partner: Hardin-Simmons University Library

Train Depot Interior

Description: Copy negative of a view inside Grand Central Station in New York City. There are people walking through the station, the clock is visible, and there is light shining in through large windows.
Date: unknown
Partner: Hardin-Simmons University Library

Train Depot

Description: Copy negative of a train station in a city. There are buildings in the background, also there is a banner with advertising for Corn Flakes that reads "The double-crisp Corn Flakes and Mickey Mouse cut outs"
Date: unknown
Partner: Hardin-Simmons University Library

Visitors Arriving in Our City

Description: The boy shown near the center of the picture is 10-year-old George Calvin Hazelwood, who was a newsboy at the time. The man beside the boy is Louis Farris, who worked for the Hazelwood and C. W. Massie families of Palo Pinto. They are meeting the train to pick up the daily newspapers in 1920. The crowd is typical of the week-end visitors arriving from the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. The Weatherford, Mineral Wells & Northwestern Railway Company reported 190,210 passengers for the year 1920. (This information came from page 92 of Art Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells.")
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library