Search Results

[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]

Description: The Hexagon was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The Convention Hall was built, in part, on the foundation of the Hexagon's DC power plant. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, which was held in 1925.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]

Description: This picture shows the staircase in the Hexagon Hotel taken from the top floor. A view of the first-floor lobby can be seen at the lower middle of the picture with the stairs spiraling from floor to floor down to it. A writer in the Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.) in 1966 remarked that "[A]s one entered the lobby once could see the stairways as they encircled each floor giving a gallery effect." See also: "Hexagon Hotel [with history]" for further details.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]

Description: Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House.
Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]

Description: The Hexagon Hotel had four staircases that spiraled down through its five floors. The interior trim was of "heart of pine"--a hardwood, despite its name. Pegs and square nails were used in the construction. The building was designed in a honeycomb pattern to maximize ventilation for the comfort of the guests. See also: Hexagon Hotel [with history] for further details.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[An Aerial View of Northwest Mineral Wells]

Description: An aerial view of northwest Mineral Wells that was taken between 1959 and 1969 is shown here. The Hexagon Hotel on North Oak Street can be seen in the center left foreground with the Convention Center immediately north (to the right)of it, and the Crazy Water Crystal plant two blocks northwest.
Date: unknown
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Photograph of the Hexagon Hotel]

Description: Photograph of the Hexagon Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. The hotel is situated beside a road next to a smaller buildings. It has four stories, multiple porches, and multiple gables with windows.
Date: 1950~
Creator: Howell, M. A.
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Palo Pinto County Historical Association

[Hexagon Hotel Booklet]

Description: Booklet containing two photographs of the Hexagon Hotel, as well as a series of architectural drawings of its floor plan.
Date: unknown
Creator: Howell, M. A.
Item Type: Text
Partner: Palo Pinto County Historical Association

[Photograph of Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: Photograph of the town of Mineral Wells, Texas. The town's buildings, streets, and surrounding landscape is visible.
Date: unknown
Creator: Evans, Daniel W.
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Palo Pinto County Historical Association

[Photograph of the Hexagon Hotel]

Description: Photograph of the Hexagon Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. The hotel is situated beside a road next to a smaller buildings. It has four stories, multiple porches, and multiple gables with windows.
Date: 1950~
Creator: Howell, M. A.
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Palo Pinto County Historical Association

[Mineral Wells, Texas, Post Cards]

Description: Postcards featuring various scenes from Mineral Wells, Texas. The eight post cards have been pasted onto a single piece of paper. From the top left, these postcards include images of cattle; a Mineral Wells welcome sign; its First Presbyterian Church; the Hexagon Hotel; someone boating on a body of water; a woman sitting on raised rocks and looking down at a creek; a drawing of the town; and a drawing of a church and community pool.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Postcard
Partner: Palo Pinto County Historical Association

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: A color photograph of the Hexagon Hotel is shown here. Please note the Convention Hall to the right (north) of the Hotel. The Convention Hall was built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, and was built over a portion of the foundation of the electric power plant of the hotel. In 1897 Galbraith was granted, by city ordinance, a 50-year franchise to illuminate the city. The Hexagon Hotel was torn down in 1959, and the Convention Center was demolished in 1977.
Date: 1897/1959
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall (built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant) for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977.
Date: 1897/1959
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: A picture of the Hexagon Hotel. See also "Hexagon Hotel [with history]." This picture was taken in 1925. Note the construction of the Convention Hall beside the Hexagon Hotel on the right. The Convention Hall was demolished in 1977
Date: 1925
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The Caldwell family ran the Hexagon Hotel as a boarding house for a while, hence the sign on the second floor of the building. H. L. Milling and his father also ran the hotel for a while, too. The building visible behind the hotel is the DC generating plant that supplied electricity to illuminate the building.
Date: 1897/1924
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: The Hexagon Hotel was built in 1895 by David G. Galbraith, the inventor of the paper clip, and co-developer of acetate synthetic fiber. According to Ellen Puerzer ("The Octagon House Inventory", Eight-Square Publishing, copyright 2011), the building was twelve-sided, clad with clapboard, built on a stone foundation. Two English stonemasons did all stonework, presumably also the work on the DC generating plant next to the hotel. The rooms within were hexagon-shaped, with a bath being shared between every two rooms. The well-ventilated "honeycomb" structure (a master-stroke in the days before air-conditioning)opened in December 1897. The stone building behind and left of the Hotel is the plant for generating electricity used for light and fans (for a fee) in every room in the hotel.
Date: 1897/1924
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Strange Structure [article]

Description: An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes in detail the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history] for further details.
Date: unknown
Creator: Neal, Maid J.
Item Type: Text
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]

Description: A view of Moore Street (now [2008] NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[North Oak Avenue ]

Description: A street scene in Mineral Wells (looking north on Oak Avenue) approximately at the corner of North Oak Avenue and West Hubbard Street is shown here. Street car (running from 1907 to 1913) tracks are visible in the foreground, and the guy wires required to keep the power wire of the trolley in place festoon the sky. The Hexagon Hotel (opened in 1897)is visible towards the back of the picture. The Vichy (later the Beach, and then later still, the Standard) well is barely visible across from the Hexagon Hotel. The streets of Mineral Wells were not paved until 1914. Please observe the utter absence of automobiles.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library