2,359 Matching Results

Search Results

[Confederate Home for Men group photo]

Description: Large group portrait, including some Confederate veterans of the U.S. Civil War, in front of the Confederate Home For Men. A.W. Taber, superintendent, and wife Minnie Lee Taber, are in center forefront. The small child is Jean Sutherland.
Date: 192X
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

Camp Breckenridge C. S. A. Monument

Description: Photograph of a monument to Camp Breckenridge. It says: "Camp Breckenridge C. S. A. Established near this site 1862. Part Confederate Frontier defense line from Red River to Rio Grande occupied by company of Texas frontier regiment. Posts were day's horseback ride apart and area patrolled regularly. Duties included curbing Indian raids, rounding up draft evaders and renegades. Confederates were poorly fed, clothed and lacked horses, ammunition. They shared few of the glories of the war, but at the cost of the lives of not a few of them. These men gave a measure of protection to a vast frontier area. A memorium to the Texans who served the confederacy. Erected by the State of Texas 1963." There is a small rendering of a Confederate flag at the bottom of the monument.
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[News Script: Lee]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about the celebration of General Robert E. Lee's birthday by the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Dallas.
Date: January 19, 1956
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Historic Plaque, Shackelford County

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Shackelford County. First inhabited by nomadic Indian tribes, Shackelford County was created in 1858 and named for Dr. John Shackelford (1790-1857). The first permanent Anglo-American settlers in this area included J. C. Lynch (1828-1912), a native of Ireland who moved here in 1858; W. H. Ledbetter (1833-84), who arrived in 1859 and later started the Ledbetter Salt Works; T. E. Jackson (b.1820), a merchant who settled in the northern part of the county before 1860; and G. W. Greer (1812-93), who operated a stage station on Hubbard Creek after 1861. During the Civil War (1861-1865), settlers took refuge at "family forts" such as Fort Mugginsville and Fort Hubbard. They gained military protection from frontier perils when the U. S. Army established Fort Griffin in 1867. Griffin, the lawless settlement that grew up around the Fort, attracted buffalo hide hunters and cattlemen driving herds up the western cattle trail. Shackelford County was organized Sept. 12, 1874, with Fort Griffin as temporary county seat. Albany was chosen permanent county seat in Nov. 1874. The county's population increased sharply after the arrival of the Texas Central Railroad in 1881. Petroleum production generated an economic boom, 1910-30. Chief industries today (1976) are petroleum and ranching. (1976)"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Memorial - Texas Civil War Frontier Defense 1861 -1865

Description: Photograph of a Civil War memorial in Breckenridge, Texas. It reads: "Texas Civil War Frontier Defense (1861 - 1865). Texas made an all-out effort for the Confederacy after voting over 3 to 1 for secession. 90,000 troops, noted for mobility and heroic daring, fought on every battlefront. An important source of supply and gateway to foreign trade thru Mexico, Texas was the storehouse of the south. Camp Breckenridge and other posts on this line were backed by patrols of state rangers, organized militia, and citizens posses scouting from nearby "family forts". This was part of a 2000 mile frontier and coastline successfully defended by Texans."
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Parker County C. S. A.

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Weatherford, Texas. It reads: "Parker County C. S. A. Part of a colonial grant to S. M. Williams and Stephen F. Austin, father of Texas, but with no permanent settlers before 1850, this county was created in 1855 and named for Isaac Parker, its legislative sponsor. By 1860 it had 4,213 people and in 1861 its voters favored secession 535 to 61. Oliver Loving, a settler, was an official stock raiser, furnishing beef to the Confederacy in the Civil War. He and 18 other men organized a full-time patrol against the frequent, bloody Indian raids. Citizens of adjacent counties took refuge here. In 1864 three local men were charged with treason. One admitted inviting Federal General J. G. Blunt to come from the Cherokee nation and give Parker County protection from the Indians. General John R. Baylor, a local rancher, was an officer in the Arizona-New Mexico campaign to make the Confederacy an ocean-to-ocean nation, and after victories there became Governor of Arizona. He was in the Confederate Congress from 1863 to 1865. Parker County sent the Confederate army nine companies. Its Company E, 19th Texas Cavalry, served in Parsons' Brigade--which fought over 20 engagements in three years with considerable distinction. (1964)"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David - February 19, 1862]

Description: Letter from Maud Fentress to her son David in which she sends news of the battle at Fort Donaldson, Tennessee. She gives her opinion of the news of the war and the generals. She says she longs to see the men drafted as there are men who are "loafing and drinking" who should be compelled to fight. She describes the capture of Confederate soldiers. She ends the letter with family news.
Date: February 19, 1862
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David Fentress, March 10, 1862]

Description: Letter from Maud Fentress to her son, David Fentress, updating him on the events of the war and their impacts on the community, and pleading with him to write her more regularly. She also gives him news of family and friends. She also includes information on the lack of availability and rising cost of goods.
Date: March 10, 1862
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 28, 1865]

Description: Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing news from Bolivar, Tennessee and it includes: a discussion regarding finance; news concerning the financial situations of family; a dialogue regarding crops to be planted and animals to be raised; news about Frank becoming Chancery Clerk and his plans to study law; news about Kate and her portion of the family's land which will be farmed on a small scale between Frank, Maud, and Kate; financial advice from Maud and news about a real estate transaction in Bolivar; a discussion about the state of society in Bolivar; a dialogue about David moving; updates on the lives and health of family and friends; a discussion about endeavoring to be a pious christian; and a dialogue concerning David's debt to Maud.
Date: September 28, 1865
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Letter from Sallie Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, May 17, 1859]

Description: Letter from Sallie Fentress to her brother David discussing news from Bolivar and it includes:town health update; news that she and Kate are not going to school; a discussion about the locusts she catches every morning; a dialogue about the weather; a discussion about David's baby and how the family wishes that David, Clara, and baby would visit; and a dialogue about handmade bonnets and clothing made by Maud, Sallie, and Kate for Clara and the baby. Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David Fentress discussing news from Bolivar and it includes: a discussion about Aunt Susan's letter which details the doctor's resignation of professorship and his wishes to move to Memphis; a dialogue about the financial gains of friends who moved to Memphis; news about Kate's schooling; a discussion about locusts and the weather; news and updates on family and friends; a discussion on Kate's musical and vocal abilities; a dialogue about Sallie's musical abilities; and a discussion about the people staying with David's Uncle John and Aunt Anne's trip to Corinth.
Date: May 17, 1859
Creator: Fentress, Maud C. & Fentress, Sallie
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
Back to Top of Screen