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The Boone Tyson Well

Description: Photograph of the Boone Tyson Well. Surrounding the well are four cars, three trucks, a camper, four tanks, a pile of long pipe and eight people on or around it. In the foreground are a man and woman standing next to a car. The date is printed on the top border of the photo, "May 56".
Date: May 1956
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Wolf Creek Heritage Museum

Famous Well

Description: This picture is taken from a series of 17 (4X4) negatives that were enclosed in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma: 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. The photographs were taken January 11, 1919. Also written on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the following: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." The rock building housing the original well was located on Lake Pinto, across West Mountain from the City of Mineral Wells. Mineral water was piped to the Famous drinking pavilion. The Famous Water Company is still [2007] in operation at 215 NW 6th Street, vending "crazy" mineral water, deep-well water, and drinking water filtered by reverse-osmosis.
Date: January 11, 1919
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: December 5, 1973
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]

Description: The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Crazy Water Well--1974]

Description: The original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "cured" her dementia. Although not used for years, the well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974."
Date: March 24, 1974
Creator: A. F. Weaver
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The well at the Alamo

Description: A well on the Alamo grounds. The convenio well dug during the mission period. Was in use in 1836.
Date: May 4, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: UNT Libraries

[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]

Description: The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home.
Date: 1900?
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Davis Bath House Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: A photograph of the allurements to be found at the Davis Bath House is shown here. This building was used for the Buckhead Bath House at one time, and then used for the Davis Bath House. The building is located in the 200 block of N. Oak Avenue. Still in existence, it is under renovation as of 2010. This photograph appears on page 52 of the Mini Edition, "Time Was in Mineral Wells..."
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Gibson Well- - Souvenir Photograph]

Description: This picture appears to be a souvenir photograph of the Gibson Well drinking pavilion and park, one of the earliest mineral water supply spots in Mineral Wells. It grew into one of the larger parks and pavilions in town. The gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed here every quarter-hour (from 1905 to 1909) on their journey to and from Lake Pinto. The Crazy Industries had acquired the property by 1938, and it became known as Crazy Park, a beautiful botanical park. The mineral water industry became a victim of the FDA and the wartime activities during World War II. As a result, the mineral water pavilions, along with other parts of the local health industry, died a slow death. The First Christian Church now occupies the site of the Gibson pavilion.
Date: 1910?
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Blind Nellie at the Austin Well]

Description: Colonel W. R. Austin came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880, and settled on Staggs Prairie. When an infection in his eye responded to mineral water treatment, he established the Austin Well, later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims. Blind Nellie was a fixture of the Austin Well for years. She had an interesting history: A cowboy rode her into town one day, and auctioned her off to the highest bidder, J.H. Coleman, who bid a dollar and a half for her. Then Bob Kyle took Coleman's bargain off his hands, but Colonel Austin was the one who profited most from her when he devised a method that used her to "pump" water from his well. This unique method of bringing water to the surface was an added attraction at the Austin. Instead of drawing it up by hand or using a power pump, Blind Nellie was trained to walk around in circles, pulling the water up from below. She would pause long enough for the water to empty and, as if on a hidden cue, would go around again as the receptacle was lowered back into the well, repeating her performance accurately each time. In later years, when she became confused in her ritual, she was allowed to retire. In retirement, however, Blind Nellie selected a place in her pasture, and during the working hours of the day she repeated the ritual of walking her circle in a size corresponding to the one she had walked for so many years at the Austin Well. She died in 1912.
Date: 1900?
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Device For Forcing Water Out Of Wells.

Description: Patent for new and useful improvements in devices for forcing water out of wells, including instructions and illustrations.
Date: November 21, 1899
Creator: Baca, August
Item Type: Patent
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Well]

Description: Country well with empty pails waiting to be used to fetch water in Cumberland Gap, Tennessee.
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Landowner's Guide to Plugging Abandoned Water Wells

Description: This publication contains information on the hazards associated with abandoned wells, including groundwater contamination.
Date: March 2010
Creator: Texas Commission on Environmental Quality
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coy Merydith Well

Description: Photograph of the Coy Merydith Well. The well is centered and there is an old car on the left side of the frame. In front of the well is a yellow camper, several metal bars and in front of them is an old blue commercial truck. On the right side of the frame is the tail end of another blue commercial truck with a hose coming out of the back. Behind the well are dirt hills.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Wolf Creek Heritage Museum

Rose Turner in Front of Bradford Well

Description: Photograph of Rose Turner standing next to a barrel in front of the Bradford Well. The well is wooden and there are many wires attached to it. Ms. Turner is wearing a dress, blazer, high heels, and a scarf around her head. In the foreground is dirt and grass.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Wolf Creek Heritage Museum

Coy Merydith Well

Description: Photograph of the Coy Merydith Well. On the left side of the frame is a tent building. In front of the well is a trailer with several barrels around it, an old car, and a small metal building.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Wolf Creek Heritage Museum

Pal-Pinto-Crystal Wells Bath House

Description: The Pal-Pinto Crystal Wells Bath House is illustrated here, although its location is unknown. Thelma Doss wrote in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" that, "It was a long, rambling structure with a large number of rooms for bathing purposes for both ladies and gentleman. There was a grand selection of baths such as Plain, Turkish, Salt Glow, Russian Massage, and Vapor baths. This large rambling structure looked more like a house for a large family than a business." This picture occurs on page 65 of A. F. Weaver's book in both First and Second Editions.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library