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[Postcard of Flatiron Building in Ft. Worth]

Description: Postcard of a narrow multi-story building, described as "Flatiron Bldg., Ft. Worth, Texas." The letter on the back reads, "What's the good word? When are you coming home? Regards to Carolyn and Joseph. C. D. B." The postcard is addressed to "Miss Mamie McFaddin Gunston Hall Washington, D. C."
Date: April 22, 1911
Partner: McFaddin-Ward House Museum

[Postcard of Central Fire Station, Fort Worth, Texas]

Description: Postcard of Fort Worth's Central Fire Station, a two-story stone building with a tower that extends an additional two stories. Horse-drawn carriages are passing by through the street. The back of the postcard has a handwritten message from the sender, A. Miller.
Date: May 25, 1911
Partner: Fire Museum of Texas

[Postcard of Tarrant County Court House in Ft. Worth]

Description: Postcard of a grand stone court house with a clock tower on the rooftop, described as "Tarrant County Court House, Ft. Worth, Texas." On the back, the letter reads, "I certainly hope you will not be gone when I return, for I surely want to see you again before you leave. Am having a great time, being at home and etc. I expect to return about Friday. Eve N. Elm." The postcard is addressed to "Miss Mamie McFadin 1906 McFadin Ave Beaumont, Tex."
Date: September 10, 1911
Creator: Eve N. Elm
Partner: McFaddin-Ward House Museum

Andy Nelson Postcard

Description: Postcard with a photo of Andy Nelson in a wagon. He was born in slavery in 1862. His life spanned from slavery to the Civil Rights movement. Andy served for 35 years as the Worshipful Master of the Mosier Valley Masonic Lodge No. 103 until his death in 1960. He served on several grand juries in the 1950s. He posed for this postcard in 1912.
Date: 1912
Creator: Lessie
Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room

[Postcard from Henry Clay, Jr. to his Family, April 28, 1917]

Description: Postcard from Henry Clay, Jr. to his family back home in Texas regarding his current trip across the Atlantic Ocean. Clay does not say anything of great importance in this letter but was recovering from his recent sea-sickness.
Date: April 28, 1917
Creator: Clay, Henry, Jr.
Partner: The University of Texas at Dallas