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[The Foster House]

Description: This picture depicts a hotel--done in Queen Anne style (Spindle-work sub-type). Please note the unusual two-story wraparound porch, also with spindle-work. It appears to have been excerpted from a fragment of advertising copy that gives the name of the building as "The Foster", and extols the owner (Mr. T[homas] J[efferson] Foster) as "...an old hotel hand of large acquaintance and wide experience, who has studied the wants and needs of his guests[,] and loses no opportunity of making them comfortable." Another picture (this from the June 5, 1903 "Daily Index") remarks that the hotel was opened in 1902, and that it is "[L]ocated just right to catch the trade--right among the wells and bath houses--as int invalid desires invariably desires to be centrally located as possible." Rates are given at $2 per day, and $12 per week. A barely-legible colophon, appearing to read "FONE" appears in the lower left-hand corner.
Date: 1910?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Fairfield Hotel

Description: The Fairfield Inn, at 814 North Oak Street, was built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin. The hotel was built into the side of East Mountain facing West, and it is said each floor had a ground level entrance. The date of construction of the hotel is not known, but Colonel Boykin built himself a home at 1301 SE 4th Avenue in 1904.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Oaks

Description: Once located at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, the Oaks met its doom in a fire that destroyed it--and the nearby Presbyterian church--in 1908. A different picture of the hotel appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 103. The picture appears to have been excerpted from an advertising bulletin. Copy found around the negative's picture does not appear to relate directly to the hotel, but further text (that was not conserved) may have mentioned this particular hotel. A colophon in the lower right-hand corner of the photograph identifies it as the work of "Evans Photo Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Star House]

Description: The Star House was built by Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Ramsey about 1900, and contained 34 rooms. Copy around the picture (unfortunately not visible here) lists the rates at $1.25 per day, or $7 to $8 per week. A.F. Weaver (in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...") locates this hotel at "315 Coke Street" [sic], but Polk's Directory for 1909, 1920 and 1927 list no such person as "J.J. Ramsey", or a "Star House" located at the address given by Weaver. The 1909 Polk's Directory lists a "Star House" at 209 Elm Street (NW 2nd Avenue), with the proprietor named as "R. L. Neal."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Carlisle House, Mineral Wells Texas

Description: The Carlisle House was once located at 316 NW 3rd Avenue, and NW 4th Street. It filled a quarter of the block, and, with sixty rooms, was one of the largest hotels in Mineral Wells. It owned and managed by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Emmett Carlisle. Mr. Carlisle died in 1911, but his widow continued to manage the hotel. The hotel met its doom in a fire that consumed six hotels and seven dwellings during its rampage. The conflagration was so thorough that the location was still empty in 1921. The Nazareth Hospital as eventually built in this location. The architecture is possibly best described as an eclectic mix of Queen Anne and Prairie styles, the latter perhaps reflecting additions to the original building. [For further details, please see the picture labeled "Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas."]
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Howard-&-White Dry-Goods Department

Description: This picture shows a float for the Elmhurst Park Fair--around 1910. From the left are: Mr. Collier; A.L. Howard; Newt Wilson; Fred White (the owner); Pet Dotson; three Howard sisters: Helen, Floe & Eppie; Lizzie Lyles; Charlie Enzy; Joe Fleming, sitting); Mr. Phillips; Mae Howard; Mr. DeBusk; Lummie Glen; Bailey Enzy; Blake Turner; Leslie DeBusk. This picture adorns page 124 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

A Label of Mineral Water

Description: Shown here is a fairly modern label from a bottle of (concentrated) mineral water. Unlike its earlier representations, it makes no promise of curing disease. Instead, the label gives instructions on how to dilute the water, when to take it--and a warning when not to imbibe.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Crazy Water and Crystals Display

Description: As the caption reads, a display of Crazy Water and Crazy Crystals in the front entrance of the plant that manufactured them is illustrated here.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Crazy Water

Description: Shown here is a label for Crazy Water, characterizing is as a "Natural, Saline, Alkaline Mineral Water--a Mild Laxative and Diuretic." The label continues with directions concerning the proper dosage. A cautious note suggests that the prospective drinker consult with a physician in cases of doubt of the required amount of water to take.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Interior of The First National Bank]

Description: This picture shows the interior of the First National Bank around the year 1930. It was located at the corner of NE 1st Avenue and Hubbard Street. The picture may be found in in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 146.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky

Description: Two boys,wearing flat paper caps,are shown here holding a sign that proclaims that Mineral Wells is "100% for 'Ike' Sablosky." The occasion is presumably a sports event--as suggested by the background. Details concerning Sablosky may be found in other pictures in this collection--under his name.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Davis Wells; The Davis Baths

Description: Pictured here is a semi-ornate brick building (with a socle presumably of stone), advertising the Davis Wells and the Davis Baths. This enterprise is not listed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." The picture appears to have been excerpted from a larger photograph, as the legend "Davis Baths" (not visible in the picture) appears on the negative. Polk's Directory for 1920 lists "Davis Mineral Baths" (proprietor, Dr. Eldred A.--the "A" stands for "Albany"--Davis) at "210 1/2 N. Oak Avenue." The business cannot be found in the 1909 or 1914 Polk's Directories. However, the 1914 Polk's Directory shows a Dr. Davis as living at 514 East Throckmorton [presently, in 2014, NE 1st Street] with his wife, Helen. The name of the bath house was changed to the "Buck Head" (or "Buckhead", as some sources have it) at some as yet unknown date.
Date: 1920?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Mineral Wells Sanitarium

Description: The Mineral Wells Sanitarium was located at 315 NW 1st Avenue. It was built by Mssrs. Blake Barber and H. M. Coleman, who were fashioning the "First building of this magnitude erected at Mineral Wells." It was listed in 1905 as being leased by Doctors J.M. Massie, and R. G. Braswell. It was later owned and operated by B.H. Milling before he built the Milling Sanitarium. The building burned in June of 1907, (as reported by the El Paso Daily Times in July 1907) with a loss estimated at $40,000. The inmates were all rescued--some narrowly. The fire started at the skating rink of the Palace Amusement Company, (a building valued at $5,000) which had just been finished, but not opened to the public. The Mineral Wells Bath House (which was empty at the time) was also a total loss, as was the Lithia Pavilion. Part of the Wann Hotel was destroyed along with thirty small frame structures. The total loss will be about $100,000 (as the same newspaper reports it). It was later torn down and replaced by Willimann's Pharmacy. The area was vacant before the sanitarium was built. Donkeys were pastured on it, but the wind brought notice of them to the guests in the Crazy Hotel, and they were forcibly removed. Currently [2010], the Woodsmen of the World club resides at this location.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Methodist-Episcopal Church

Description: The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built at 301 NE 1st Street in 1898. The larger structure shown here resulted from expansion of the original frame structure and the addition of brick to the exterior in 1903. This church was later torn down to make room for the larger First Methodist Church, which still [2007] occupies this site. This picture is a portion of a collage that shows several church buildings.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Crazy Hotel Brochure]

Description: This photograph illustrates a fold-out brochure of the Crazy Hotel with various scenic views of things to see and do around the city, along with different modes of transportation to and from Mineral Wells.
Date: 1930?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Crazy Water Bottling and Crazy Crystals Plant 1940

Description: This picture shows the facade of the Crazy Crystals Plant as it was in 1940. The water tower announces the place as the "Home of Crazy Water." The building now [2009] houses a box-making enterprise.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Crazy Well Water Company

Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. Recto describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Date: 1920?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Howard's Hardware Store 1903

Description: A printed legend on the top of the photograph reads: "Howard Hardward [sic] 1903" Please note the crowded aisles of miscellaneous articles. Also, please notice the two counters (equipped with clerks in shirt-sleeves) and the bridge above and between them that contains further articles. A colophon at the bottom of the picture indicates that "Dan W. Evans, Photo. of Mineral Wells" took the picture.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Mineral Wells Sanitorium

Description: An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[An Early View of Mesquite Street]

Description: This picture shows the D.M. Howard Block, on the lower end of Mesquite Street [2011], the intersection of Hubbard and SE 1st streets), facing west. The principal D.M. Howard building (farthest to the left in the photograph) survived to house various furniture establishments until 1975, when it was demolished. The three subsidiary buildings had been removed earlier. A legend on the base of the original photograph reads: "LOWER END OF MESQUITE STREET--Photo by McClure". Please note the absence of automobiles, the complete lack of paving, and the large traveling-bonnet worn by the lady in the foreground. The telegraph pole in the foreground appears to have been hand-hewn. The unpaved road supplies corroborating evidence that the photograph was taken before 1914. The identity of McClure, however, remains unknown. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 122.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Dry Goods--W.H.H.Hightower

Description: This picture shows what is conjectured to be a business from either the latest nineteenth, or the earliest twentieth centuries. There appears to be no display window nor door to it, only two posts to hold up the story above. The second story appears to be a clapboard false-front, as the windows and balconet seem only to be painted. Three men stand stiffly inside, one of them by what appears to be a display of straw hats--which perhaps dates the picture to the end of the nineteenth or beginning of the twentieth century. The second story bears the legend DRY GOODS/ BOOTS SHOES HATS &c. GENTS FURNISHING DRESS GOODS &c. W.H. HIGHTOWER. Three flags appear to adorn the front. A holograph on the back reads: "W.H. Hightower Grandfather of Mrs. Lyday & Grady & Rayford Hightower merchant from Georgia first settled in Johnson Co. near Cleburne located near Lattners [sic]"
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library