19 Matching Results

Search Results

Interviews and the documentation of Vietnam combat operations, part 2

Description: Sound recording of a round table discussion featuring Peter Arnett, James Collins, Oscar Fitzgerald, Ward Just, Forrest Pogue, Benis Frank, and Robert Zimmerman, at the Eighth Annual National Colloquium of the Oral History Association at West Point.
Date: November 3, 1973
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Interviews and the documentation of Vietnam combat operations, part 1

Description: Sound recording of a round table discussion featuring Peter Arnett, James Collins, Oscar Fitzgerald, Ward Just, Forrest Pogue, Benis Frank, and Robert Zimmerman, at the Eighth Annual National Colloquium of the Oral History Association at West Point.
Date: November 3, 1973
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Session on Interviewers and their Training]

Description: Sound recording of members of the Oral History Association giving a speech about interviewers and their training. Session recorded at Arden House during the 2nd Annual Oral History Colloquium.
Date: November 18, 1967
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Specialty Oral History

Description: Sound recording of E. Douglas Hamilton giving a talk titled "Specialty Oral History" during the 2nd National Oral History Colloquium at Arden House in Harriman, New York.
Date: November 1967
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The American Dream; The Success Ethic

Description: Sound recording of Jo Blatti giving a talk titled "The American Dream; The Success Ethic" during the 14th Annual National Colloquium on Oral History at State University of New York, Buffalo, NY. Michael Frisch is the moderator and commentator during the talk.
Date: October 26, 1979
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Etiquette of Race Relations

Description: Sound recording of Harlon E. Joye, E. Barnerd West, and Dana F. White from the Living Atlanta Project giving a talk titled "The Etiquette of Race Relations" during the Buffalo 14th Annual National Colloquium on Oral History.
Date: October 26, 1979
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Morning Session During the 2nd Annual Colloquium]

Description: Sound recording of Oral History Association members conducting a morning session during the 2nd Annual Oral History Colloquium at Arden House in Harriman, New York.
Date: November 21, 1967
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

New Business Session

Description: Sound recording of a talk during the 2nd National Oral History Association Colloquium titled "New Business Session".
Date: November 1967
Creator: Oral History Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Oral History Interview with Albert Bouley, June 27, 2001

Description: Interview with Albert Bouley, a U. S. Marine during World War II. He discusses his enlistment in the Marines just after Pearl Harbor; his assignment to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Division; the battle of Guadalcanal; malaria and dysentery; the battle of Cape Gloucester; the use of Pavuvu as a base; the battle of Peleliu; his return to the United States; guard duty at the Brooklyn Naval Yard and his service as an instructor in a heavy weapons school before the end of the war. He joined the Air Force 2 1/2 years later to be able to fly and work on planes, then retire to become a teacher in California, and finally settled in Texas.
Date: June 27, 2001
Creator: Cox, Floyd & Bouley, Albert
Partner: National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Oral History Interview with Boyd K. Miller, January 21, 2003

Description: Interview with Boyd K. Miller, a draftsman and pilot during World War II. He discusses being drafted out of college and working as an artist and draftsman. Since he studied art in college, he worked on diagrams and charts. He then transferred to the Air Corps to become a pilot and trained in Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Alabama, New York, Georgia, Florida and Texas.
Date: January 21, 2003
Creator: Misenhimer, Richard & Miller, Boyd K.
Partner: National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Oral History Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, January 15, 2004

Description: Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, a pilot during World War II. He describes growing up on a farm in Georgia, going to college at Berry, and working for Sears, Roebuck, and the Royal Typewriter Company before joining the U. S. Navy. He tells an anecdote about joining the navy so he could go to New York to see the World's Fair, since he had heard the Atlanta Reserve would be making a trip to the Fair. He began flight training in Florida in December 1940, finished the next September, then drove cross-country to San Francisco after the Pearl Harbor attack. He eventually joined the USS Enterprise in April 1942 and saw the B-25 bombers in the Doolittle Raid take off. He was part of Bombing Squadron Six and trained under Commander Best to learn how to do scouting flights, navigation, and dive bombing. He then describes his participation in the Battle of Midway, the hours before take-off, his first view of the Japanese fleet, and his bombing mission. He was later assigned to the USS Hornet and had to fly off to a little island so that planes from the USS Wasp could land on the Hornet after their ship had been torpedoed. He contracted malaria while he was on the island. He transferred to the USS Northhampton, then back to the United States to train pilots in dive-bombing at Jacksonville, Florida. He then received post-graduate training in aeronautical engineering at Annapolis and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in order to research and develop aircraft logistics.
Date: January 15, 2004
Creator: Cox, Floyd & Hopkins, Lewis R.
Partner: National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Oral History Interview with Richard Bennett, November 15, 2001

Description: Interview with Richard (Dick) Bennett, a pilot during World War II. He discusses his enlistment in the Army Air Corps, basic training and flight school. He then went to a base in South Carolina to learn to fly B-25s. At Fort Myers, Florida he flew B-26 bombers and trained to fly them off of aircraft carriers so they could drop torpedos on the Japanese fleet during naval battles. He traveled across the Pacific to Brisbane only to be told that they didn't have B-26s for the crews; the colonel there knew nothing about the plan to launch B-26s from aircraft carriers, so they were sent to New Guinea to fly B-17s and supplement the crews for those bombers. From there they made bombing runs or "Washing Machine Charlie"-type runs to keep people awake at night on various Japanese targets in the islands, particularly the base at Rabaul. In fall of 1943, the Army grounded the B-17s due to the damage they had incurred and replaced them with B-24s. The men received manuals and were given only a few days to familiarize themselves with the new planes. They were then sent on bombing runs. He finished his tour of duty at the end of 1943, came back to the United States, and went on a War Bond drive throughout New York. He then went to Ohio to become a B-17 instructor, and traveled to various bases and training schools, including Alamogordo, New Mexico, where he visited only a day after the first atomic bomb test.
Date: November 15, 2001
Creator: Cox, Floyd & Bennett, Richard
Partner: National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Oral History Interview with Glenn E. McDuffie, January 21, 2008

Description: Interview with Glenn E. McDuffie, an Armed Guard in the U. S. Navy during World War II. He discusses lying about his age in order to join the navy at 15 and his experience in boot camp. He served as an Armed Guard on merchant ships that transported supplies across the Atlantic and remembers being in London while German bombers flew overhead. He transported German prisoners out of Marseilles and Naples shortly after the liberation of those cities. He remembers going to Times Square upon hearing that the Japanese had surrendered. He claims to have been the sailor in the iconic photo of the sailor kissing the nurse in Times Square on V-J Day. He describes how he proved he was the sailor in the photo, what he did after the war, and how he learned that his brother survived the Bataan Death March.
Date: January 21, 2008
Creator: Misenhimer, Richard & McDuffie, Glenn E.
Partner: National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation

Oral History Interview with Jerell E. Crow, August 24, 2002

Description: Interview with Jerell E. Crow. He entered the Coast Guard in 1940 and trained in Florida and New York City. He served aboard a Landing Ship, Tank (LST) when those ships were first introduced. He traveled to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to the Neville Island Shipyard operated by the Dravo Corporation as part of a crew that brought an LST down the Mississippi River to New Orleans. From there, the crew practiced operations at Biloxi, Mississippi. Eventually, Crow travelled to San Diego aboard the LST through the Panama Canal. From there, he went to Guadalcanal and unloaded tanks. Eventually, his ship was hit at Saipan and he was wounded. He also served aboard an LST during the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Afterwards, Crow's LST was present in Tokyo Bay for the surrender. He visited Hiroshima while on occupation duty after the atomic bomb was dropped. Eventually, his LST made its way back to San Francisco where he was discharged.
Date: August 24, 2002
Creator: Rabalais, Larry & Crow, Jerell E.
Partner: National Museum of the Pacific War/Admiral Nimitz Foundation