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[Simón Lerma de León Photo, June 1843]

Description: Copy negative of Simón Lerma de León posed for a portrait. He is looking to the left and is wearing a dark suit and tie.
Date: unknown
Partner: Private Collection of Matta Family

Austin About 1839 or 1841.

Description: Photograph of a print in the book "Austin Yesterday and Today". The Daughters of the Republic of Texas own the original artwork.
Date: unknown
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

The New Capital of Texas in January 1, 1840

Description: Photograph of an illustration by Edward Hall of the City of Austin; the new capitol of Texas in January 1, 1840.
Date: unknown
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

[Austin City Plan, 1840]

Description: Photograph of an illustration by Edward Hall of a city plan for the Texas Government buildings in Austin. Architectural renderings of buildings can be found on the top half of the illustration. Handwritten on the photograph is a list of buildings that are seen in the plan including: the President's House, Capitol Hill and Bullock's Tavern.
Date: unknown
Creator: Bill Malone Photography
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

Bullock's Hotel

Description: Line drawing of Bullock's Hotel. Bullock's stood at the northwest corner of Congress Avenue and Pecan (6th) Street 1839-1852
Date: unknown
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

A. J. Adcock

Description: Photograph of a man standing in front of a bush. This is a photograph of A. J. Adcock a mason in Van Horn, TX.
Date: 1936
Partner: Clark Hotel Museum

[Marshall University, Marshall]

Description: Marshall University was one of Marshall's earliest schools. It was authorized by Sam Houston in 1842. In 1843 Peter Whetstone, founder of Marshall, gave ten acres of land for educational purposes. The plot is located on the corner of W. Houston and College St., where Marshall Junior High School stands today. The building shown in the picture was contracted in 1851. It served the community until 1910, when it closed its doors. The school was never a true university. It served educational needs of more youthful boys and girls. A historical marker on the campus recognizes the school's history and contributions.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[J. B. Williamson House, Harrison County]

Description: The J. B. Williamson House is located on Hynson Springs Road west of Marshall in Harrison County. The house was built during the 1840s or earlier as a dog-trot log cabin. It was occupied by pioneers, farmers, and sharecroppers before being purchased as part of a parcel by Capt. G. C. Dial, a former army soldier, founder, and patriot of the Texas Republic. Dial sold a large tract to S. D. Rainey, who traded it to Martha and A. Judson Gibbs. In 1867, J. B. Williamson bought the "Dial, Rainey, and Gibbs Place." J. B. Williamson was a lawyer and district judge. During 1872-73, Williamson ordered the renovations which enlarged the cabin and added the Greek Revival architectural elements. His daughter and son-in law, Eunice and W. H. Attebery, acquired the home later and established the largest peach orchards in Texas on the property. In 1962, the D. H. Greggs of Houston bought the home, restored it, and secured the Texas Medallion and a listing on the National Register of Historic Places. The Greggs donated the house to the Harrison County Historical Society in 1982, which continues to preserve the property.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Photograph of Map of Texas]

Description: Photograph of an 1842 map of Texas.
Date: unknown
Creator: Nicholson, Eula Wilcox (Mrs. John A.)
Partner: Denton Public Library

City of Fort Worth Texas Historical Marker

Description: Texas historical marker on the lawn of the Tarrant County Courthouse. The site of the original fort was selected by Major Ripley Arnold and Colonel Johnson. The post was referred to as Fort Worth although it was not formally designated as a fort until several months after it was established. Arnold served under William Jenkins Worth at the Battle of Monterey and his admiration for the general was so great that they decided to name the new post Fort Worth in his honor. The fort was abandoned as a military post in 1853, but the civilians who lived and had businesses in the vicinity took over the barracks, officers' homes, stables and made business establishments. In this way the fort became the nucleus of the present-day city of Fort Worth.
Date: unknown
Creator: Henderson, C.L.
Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room

Major Robert Anderson

Description: Robert Anderson. (June 14, 1805 – October 26, 1871) was a United States Army officer during the American Civil War. Anderson was considered a national hero for his defiance of the Confederacy in the first battle of the Civil War at Fort Sumter in April 1861. Anderson was born into a slave owning family in Kentucky. He graduated West Point in 1825. He served in the Black Hawk War of 1832. He was an artillery officer in the Mexican-American War and was wounded at the battle of Molino del Rey. In 1857 he was promoted to the rank of Major in the 1st Regiment of Artillery in the Regular Army. Anderson held various administrative post during the Civil War, and was a very effective speaker on recruitment tours for the Union Army. After Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Anderson returned to Fort Sumter and raised the flag over the battered Fort on April 14, 1865 – the same day Lincoln was assassinated.
Date: unknown
Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Olive Ann Oatman Fairchild]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Olive Ann Oatman Fairchild (1837-1903) in Sherman, Texas. Text: Captured in Arizona at age 13 (1851) by Yavapai Indians, who massacred 6 members of family. Sold to Mojave Indians, she was treated kindly but bore mark of a slave - blue, cactus needle tattoo on skin - for rest of life. Ransomed by Army at Fort Yuma, 1856. Lived in California, then New York. There she married J. B. Fairchild in 1865. About 1872 moved to Sherman, where husband founded city bank. Resided in Sherman until death in 1903.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Peter W. Grayson]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Peter W. Grayson in Sherman, Texas. Text: Peter Wagener Grayson was born in 1788 in Bardstown, Virginia (later part of Kentucky) to Benjamin and Caroline (Taylor) Grayson, members of a politically prominent family. He served in the War of 1812 and worked in Louisville as an attorney, businessman and legislator. Well-spoken in legal matters and also a poet, he nevertheless amassed substantial debt and privately combated mental illness. In 1830, Grayson wrote to Stephen F. Austin about acquiring land in Texas, and by 1832 he had established a plantation near Matagorda. He also became a friend and advisor to Austin. During Austin's imprisonment in Mexico City in 1834, Grayson and Spencer Jack went there with petitions in hopes of freeing the Empresario. In December 1834, they secured Austin's bail, although he was not free to leave until the following summer. Settlers began preparations for revolution soon after Austin returned to Texas, and Grayson worked with him to outline an independent government. Grayson also served as president of the Council of War and Aide-de-Camp to both Austin and Gen. Edward Burleson. After Texas' victory at San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, Grayson acted as interpreter and attorney general, signing the Treaties of Velasco on May 14, 1836. Grayson went with others to Washington, D.C. to gain recognition of the Texas Republic and discuss annexation to the United States, but the efforts were unsuccessful. He served as Texas Attorney General and as naval agent, and was Sam Houston's candidate for the Texas presidency in 1838. On July 9 of that year, though, while traveling through Tennessee, Grayson took his life, leaving a note that his previous mental illness had returned. In 1846, following the eventual annexation of Texas to the United States, the Texas ...
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: The Rev. John Silliman Moore]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for The Rev. John Silliman Moore in Sherman, Texas. Text: Born in Mississippi in 1840, John Silliman Moore attended college in Georgia before serving in the Civil War, where he was wounded at Seven Pines, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. In 1870, after graduating from the Presbyterian Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina, he pastored churches in Jefferson, Tyler, McKinney and then Sherman, Texas, where he led the First Presbyterian Church from 1879 until his death in 1903. He sat on Austin College's Board of Trustees from c. 1875 to 1902, helping relocate the school from Huntsville to Sherman.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Marker: Fort Johnson]

Description: Photograph of the marker for Fort Johnson in Pottsboro, Texas. Text: Established by William G. Cooke in 1840 as a part of the defense of the military road from Red River to Austin, named in honor of Colonel Francis W. Johnson (1799-1888), commander of the Texas army at the capture of San Antonio, December 10, 1835. Place of rendezvous for the Snivley Expedition which set out April 25, 1843. The settlement in the vicinity was known as Georgetown.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Marker: Thompson House]

Description: Photograph of the marker for the Thompson House in Denison, Texas. Text: Built by Judge James G. Thompson in the early 1840's on the south bank of Red River at Preston Road. In 1942 it was bought by Ms. Nellie Chambers and moved east of Denison to save it from the advancing waters of the newly formed Lake Texoma. Upon her death, her heirs donated the home to the village. It was moved to its present location and restored in 1986.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

Monument Marking the Grave of Isaac Parker

Description: Monument marking the grave of Isaac Parker (Apr. 7, 1793-Aprl 14, 1883), in Turner Cemetery. Parker County is named for him.
Date: unknown
Creator: Jon Vandagriff
Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room

Fort Parker

Description: Photograph of a corner section of Fort Parker. This segment appears to be constructed entirely of logs including the fence and corner tower. Old Fort Parker is a reconstructed fort that pays tribute to the Parker family and other pioneers who paid a high price to settle in Texas.
Date: unknown
Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room

Fort Parker

Description: Portion of the interior of the fort is shown. Old Fort Parker is a reconstructed fort that pays tribute to the Parker family and other pioneers who paid a high price to settle in Texas. The Parkers and other members of their church came to Texas from Crawford County, Illinois in 1833. In 1832, Daniel Parker, a staunch theologian, had gained permission to settle in Texas. After organizing those who wanted to go to Texas into the Predestinarian Baptist Church, they all left Illinois in July of 1833 in ox- drawn wagons. Daniel and the majority of his followers settled near the present City of Elkhart, where a replica of their Pilgrim Baptist Church still stands in their memory. Other members of the group preferred to settle farther west, near the Navasota River. Elder John Parker and three of his sons (Silas, James, and Benjamin) began in December 1833 to clear land and to construct "Parker's Fort." On May 19, 1836, Comanche Indians attacked the fort; 5 were killed, 5 were captured, and the 21 survivors made their way to where Palestine is today. The most famous of the captives was Cynthia Ann Parker. She adapted to Indian ways and later married Chief Peta Nocona. Quanah Parker, the last great Comanche chief, who was involved in the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon, was the most famous of their three children.
Date: unknown
Partner: Tarrant County College NE, Heritage Room

Republic of Texas Land Grant Certificate

Description: This is a land grant from the Republic of Texas. It is to James Cole of Robertson County and is signed by Sam Houston.
Date: March 28, 1844
Partner: Dallas Heritage Village

[The Dickinsons]

Description: Copy negative of a portrait of Caleb Eldridge Dickinson, David Brown Dickinson, and John Wesley Dickinson.
Date: November 19, 1988
Creator: Cherokee County Historical Society
Partner: Cherokee County Historical Commission

[The Dickinsons]

Description: Copy negative of a portrait of Caleb Eldridge Dickinson, David Brown Dickinson, and John Wesley Dickinson.
Date: November 19, 1988
Creator: Cherokee County Historical Society
Partner: Cherokee County Historical Commission