12 Matching Results

Explore Results

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Olive Ann Oatman Fairchild]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Olive Ann Oatman Fairchild (1837-1903) in Sherman, Texas. Text: Captured in Arizona at age 13 (1851) by Yavapai Indians, who massacred 6 members of family. Sold to Mojave Indians, she was treated kindly but bore mark of a slave - blue, cactus needle tattoo on skin - for rest of life. Ransomed by Army at Fort Yuma, 1856. Lived in California, then New York. There she married J. B. Fairchild in 1865. About 1872 moved to Sherman, where husband founded city bank. Resided in Sherman until death in 1903.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Peter W. Grayson]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Peter W. Grayson in Sherman, Texas. Text: Peter Wagener Grayson was born in 1788 in Bardstown, Virginia (later part of Kentucky) to Benjamin and Caroline (Taylor) Grayson, members of a politically prominent family. He served in the War of 1812 and worked in Louisville as an attorney, businessman and legislator. Well-spoken in legal matters and also a poet, he nevertheless amassed substantial debt and privately combated mental illness. In 1830, Grayson wrote to Stephen F. Austin about acquiring land in Texas, and by 1832 he had established a plantation near Matagorda. He also became a friend and advisor to Austin. During Austin's imprisonment in Mexico City in 1834, Grayson and Spencer Jack went there with petitions in hopes of freeing the Empresario. In December 1834, they secured Austin's bail, although he was not free to leave until the following summer. Settlers began preparations for revolution soon after Austin returned to Texas, and Grayson worked with him to outline an independent government. Grayson also served as president of the Council of War and Aide-de-Camp to both Austin and Gen. Edward Burleson. After Texas' victory at San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, Grayson acted as interpreter and attorney general, signing the Treaties of Velasco on May 14, 1836. Grayson went with others to Washington, D.C. to gain recognition of the Texas Republic and discuss annexation to the United States, but the efforts were unsuccessful. He served as Texas Attorney General and as naval agent, and was Sam Houston's candidate for the Texas presidency in 1838. On July 9 of that year, though, while traveling through Tennessee, Grayson took his life, leaving a note that his previous mental illness had returned. In 1846, following the eventual annexation of Texas to the United States, the Texas ...
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: The Rev. John Silliman Moore]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for The Rev. John Silliman Moore in Sherman, Texas. Text: Born in Mississippi in 1840, John Silliman Moore attended college in Georgia before serving in the Civil War, where he was wounded at Seven Pines, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. In 1870, after graduating from the Presbyterian Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina, he pastored churches in Jefferson, Tyler, McKinney and then Sherman, Texas, where he led the First Presbyterian Church from 1879 until his death in 1903. He sat on Austin College's Board of Trustees from c. 1875 to 1902, helping relocate the school from Huntsville to Sherman.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Marker: Fort Johnson]

Description: Photograph of the marker for Fort Johnson in Pottsboro, Texas. Text: Established by William G. Cooke in 1840 as a part of the defense of the military road from Red River to Austin, named in honor of Colonel Francis W. Johnson (1799-1888), commander of the Texas army at the capture of San Antonio, December 10, 1835. Place of rendezvous for the Snivley Expedition which set out April 25, 1843. The settlement in the vicinity was known as Georgetown.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Marker: Thompson House]

Description: Photograph of the marker for the Thompson House in Denison, Texas. Text: Built by Judge James G. Thompson in the early 1840's on the south bank of Red River at Preston Road. In 1942 it was bought by Ms. Nellie Chambers and moved east of Denison to save it from the advancing waters of the newly formed Lake Texoma. Upon her death, her heirs donated the home to the village. It was moved to its present location and restored in 1986.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Grayson County]

Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Grayson County in Sherman, Texas. Text: In the mainstream of the Texas history for more than a century, this area was, in 1837, the site of Colonel Holland Coffee's Trading Post, a landmark structure at the Preston Bend Crossing of the Red River. It was a focal point beginning in 1842 for settlers of the important Peters Colony. In 1846 the county was created from part of Fannin County by the 1st State Legislature. It was named for Peter W. Grayson, who immigrated to Texas in 1830, served in the Texas Revolution, and was attorney general in the Republic. Also in 1848 the county was organized and Sherman was made county seat. The original town site was 5 1/4 mi. W. of here. It was moved to its present location, 1848. Honoree of the town name was Colonel Sidney Sherman, a hero of the Battle of San Jacinto. The place is distinguished for having had at least five courthouses and for its superior schools of the 19th century. It was once known as the "Athens of Texas". In 1858 the famous Butterfield Trail crossed the county and in the same period and later, a number of cattle trails and early railroads traversed the area. Today Lake Texoma, created 1939-1944, is a county tourist attraction. The Sherman-Denison region was named a standard metropolitan statistical area, 1967. (1969)
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Preston Road/Shawnee Trail]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Preston Road/Shawnee Trail in Pottsboro, Texas. Text: In 1840, authorized by an 1838 act of the Congress of the Republic of Texas, Col. W.G. Cooke and the Texas First Infantry Regiment laid out a military road from Austin through what became Dallas to the Holland Coffee Trading Post on Red River (later covered by Lake Texoma). Coffee developed the town of Preston near the trading post, and Cooke's military route became known as Preston Road between Red River and Dallas. Immigrants came from Missouri and Arkansas through Indian Territory (Oklahoma) into Texas along Preston Road. In one six-week period in 1845, roughly 1,000 wagons crossed the river into Texas. From the mid-1850s the road marked the route for Texas's first cattle drive. Later known as the Shawnee Trail, it probably was named for a Native American village called Shawneetown north of what became Denison. Cattle swam the Red River at Rock Bluff Crossing, a natural rock formation that served as a chute into the water, later the site of the city of Sherman's water intake station on Lake Texoma. This remained the principal route to the North for Texas cattle until the Civil War. The last large herds moved through Grayson County in 1871. The old route remains visible at Rocky Point on Lake Texoma, and along Hanna Drive. The overall passage is followed by parts of Preston Road in Grayson County, a farm-to-makret road and State Highway Route 289, and Preston Road in Dallas. (1998)
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Davis-Ansley Log Cabin Home]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Davis-Ansley Log Cabin Home in Denison, Texas. Text: Blacksmith Micajah C. Davis (1790-1860), one of the founders of Grayson County, erected this cabin about 1840 at Iron Ore Creek Settlement near present Denison. The pioneer home was built of hand-hewn oak logs with a plank floor. Sold in 1870 to Josephus R. Ansley (1826-1873) and his wife Gilley (1826-1915), the cabin was later occupied by their son Will (1861-1952). Mr. and Mrs. John Summers purchased the structure in 1953 and donated it in 1972 to the Old Settlers Village. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1976
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: First Christian Church]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for First Christian Church in Van Alstyne, Texas. Text: The predecessor of this church, the first Disciples of Christ congregation in Texas, was founded during the winter of 1841-1842 at McKinney's Landing in Bowie county near the Texas-Arkansas border. Collin McKinney, pioneer settler and signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, was the leader of the Bowie county congregation, which had worshipped informally since 1831. Between 1844 and 1846 the group moved to Liberty (later called "Mantua"), three miles southwest of here. In 1846, under McKinney and J.B. Wilmeth, the congregation was reorganized as the "Liberty Church" with eighteen members. In 1854, the First Mantua Christian Church was built. In this early structure a rail in the center aisle separated men from women. No offering plate was passed - donations were placed on the communion table. Members constructed their own "hymn books" which doubled as souvenir and recipe books. Founders of churches in many cities including Galveston, Sherman, and Glen Rose were members of the Mantua Church. In 1887 the Mantua Group organized the church on this site in the infant town of Van Alstyne, located on the Houston & Texas Central Railroad. In 1891, the Mantua and Van Alstyne churches joined membership.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Friendship Cemetery]

Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Friendship Cemetery in Sherman, Texas. Text: Opened in 1830's with burials of local "Yankee Town" settlers. Closed 1859 by a private owner. Reopened by Madison Walsh and Nolan Stewart, 1861. Enlarged and improved 1892, when adjacent Methodist Church was built. The cemetery has been used in three eras: Republic of Texas, the Confederacy, and the Union. (1967)
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Sophia Porter]

Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Confederate Lady Paul Revere, Sophia Porter, (1813-1899) in Pottsboro, Texas. Text: Settled 1839 at Glen Eden, a site now under Lake Texoma (N of here). Her husband, early trader Holland Coffee, built fine home. Guests included Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, other army of officers, 1845-60. During Civil War, wined and dined passing federal scouts found out they were seeking Col. Jas. Bourland, Confederate Defender of Texas Frontier, while guests were busy, she slipped out, swam her horse across icy Red River, warned Col. Bourland, helped prevent federal invasion of North Texas. (1965)
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Washburn Cemetery]

Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Washburn Cemetery in Bells, Texas. Text: Samuel and Mary Washburn and their family moved to Texas from Missouri in 1836. Washburn was granted 1280 acres of land in 1838. As more settlers moved into the area, a burial site was needed and a portion of land on the south edge of the Washburn survey was set aside for a cemetery. The oldest marked grave is that of infant Mary Gentry in 1867. However, many graves marked only with rocks or Bois D'Arc posts are believed to be from the 1850s. The 2.5-acre cemetery contains about 300 graves. The Washburn Cemetery Association maintains the site.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West