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Historic plaque - Fannin County Courthouses

Description: Photograph of a historic marker. It reads: "Fannin County Courthouses. Commissioners' Court first met at Jacob Black's cabin on Feb. 26, 1836, before Fannin County was officially organized. In 1838 Warren (near present Ambrose in Grayson County) was named the county seat. The courthouse built there in 1840 was a two-story oak and cedar structure with rough plank floors. In 1843 the county seat was moved to Bois D'Arc, town's name was changed to Bonham, for an Alamo hero, the next year. Judge John P. Simpson donated land for the small log courthouse of 1843. Later another cabin was built with a breezeway connecting the two. In this early courthouse jurors sat above the courtroom in a loft that could be reached only by an outside ladder. This log building served until 1881 when a two-story brick structure was erected at the same location. This was replaced in 1888 by a three-story courthouse made of native stone from Gober, south of Bonham, and built by Scottish-born stonemasons Kane and Cormack. Fire in 1929 destroyed the clock steeple, and the building was remodeled. Using part of the 1888 structure, this courthouse was constructed in 1965-6 with a facade of Leuders stone. It was dedicated by Governor John Connally. (1974)"
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Confederate memorial, Fannin County

Description: Photograph of a Confederate memorial in Fannin County. It reads: "To the Confederate soldiers who sacrificed their lives for a just cause, this monument is lovingly dedicated by the Daughters of the Confederacy, aided by the Confederate Veterans Association of Fannin county."
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Confederate memorial, Fannin County

Description: Photograph of a Confederate memorial on the grounds of the Fannin County courthouse. It is a tall monument, with a statue of a man at the top. There is text on the base of the statue, and there are cars parked behind it.
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic plaque - The Paris Fire, 1916

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Paris, Texas. It reads: "The Paris Fire. 1916. Although Paris was founded in the mid-1840s, many of its historic structures were lost in a fire that destroyed almost half the town in 1916. The blaze started about five o'clock on the afternoon of March 21, 1916, at the S. J. Long warehouse near the southwest city limits. Its cause is unknown, but one theory is that a spark from a switch engine ignited dry grass near the warehouse. Winds estimated at 50 miles per hour soon blew the fire out of control as it burned a funnel-shaped path to the northeast edge of Paris. Firemen from Bonham, Cooper, Dallas, Honey Grove, and Hugo, Okla., helped the Paris Fire Department battle the flames, which were visible up to 40 miles away. The blaze destroyed most of the central business district and swept through a residential area before it was controlled at about sunrise on March 22. Property damage from this fire was estimated at $11,000,000. The structures burned included the federal building and post office, Lamar County Courthouse and jail, City Hall, most commercial buildings, and several churches. Rebuilding was begun quickly as townspeople collected relief funds and opened their homes to the victims. A railroad and market center before the disaster, Paris soon regained its former prosperity. (1976)"
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic plaque - John James Culbertson

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Paris, Texas. It reads: "John James Culbertson, March 16, 1853 - September 27, 1932. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, John James Culbertson grew up in large Northeastern cities. He married Emily Lou Lee of New Jersey in 1882 and soon became a salesman for a cotton product company based in Alabama. During his southern travels, Culbertson saw the potential for profit from cottonseed oil. He moved to Paris and was instrumental in building the first Paris cotton mill about 1884. The company, Paris Oil Works, was sold to American Cotton Oil Trust in 1887, and Culbertson moved to Arkansas to manage a Southern Oil Company Plant. Four years later the Culbertsons returned to Paris, where he built a small cottonseed oil empire through the Paris Oil and Cotton Company, later known as Southland Cotton Oil Company. Culbertson was asked to participate in a master plan for the growth of Paris in 1913. As an influential Texas financier, he was appointed to the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas when it was formed in 1914. His nationwide reputation as a cotton producer led President Woodrow Wilson to appoint him to a board that organized a bureau to oversee cotton and cottonseed products for the U. S. Food Administration in 1917. After Paris was ravaged by fire in 1916, John and Emily Culbertson were among leading citizens who rebuilt the city. Held in high esteem by the people of Paris, the Culbertsons gave many public spaces, monuments and works of art to the city and several local institutions, including the Paris Public Library an the fountain of imported Carrara marble on the city's central plaza. (1999)"
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Veterans Memorial, Red River County

Description: Veterans memorial, Red River County. In grateful memory we dedicate this memorial to those from Red River Cunty who died in the service of their country. They stand in the unbroken line of patriots who were willing to die so freedom might live and grow and increase its blessings. Freedom lives adn through it these patriots live ina way which humbles the undertakings of mankind.
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic plaque - Members of Confederate Congress

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Clarksville, Texas. It reads: "Texas in the Civil War, Members of Confederate Congress. During the 4 years, 4 months after secession, Texas sent 18 lawmakers to the Confederate capitols. Her delegates to the provisional congress, Feb. 1861 to Feb. 1862 were John R. Gregg, Freestone County; John Hemphill, Travis County; Wm. B. Ochiltree, Nacogdoches County; Williamson S. Oldham, Washington County; John H. Reagan, Anderson County; Thomas N. Waul, Gonzales County; and Louis T. Wigfall, Harrison County. Texans in the first Confederate States Congress, Feb. 1862 - Feb. 1864, were B. H. Epperson of Red River County; M. D. Graham, Rusk County; Peter W. Gray, Harris County; Claiborne C. Herbert, Colorado County; Frank B. Sexton, San Augustine County; John A. Wilcox, Bexar County; and Wm. B. Wright, Lamar County. Oldham and Wigfall served as senators, 1862 - 1865. Herbert and Sexton were re-elected to the second Confederate Congress, in 1864. Their colleagues were Gen. John R. Baylor, Parker County; Anthony M. Branch, Walker County; Stephen H. Darden, Gonzales County; and Simpson H. Morgan, Red River County. Several Congressmen left the legislative branch of the government for the battlefield, two becoming Generals. Others left for Presidential assignments -- one, Reagan, to be Postmaster-General in the cabinet. (1965)"
Date: October 10, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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