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Famous Well

Description: This picture is taken from a series of 17 (4X4) negatives that were enclosed in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma: 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. The photographs were taken January 11, 1919. Also written on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the following: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." The rock building housing the original well was located on Lake Pinto, across West Mountain from the City of Mineral Wells. Mineral water was piped to the Famous drinking pavilion. The Famous Water Company is still [2007] in operation at 215 NW 6th Street, vending "crazy" mineral water, deep-well water, and drinking water filtered by reverse-osmosis.
Date: January 11, 1919
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]

Description: The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Crazy Well]

Description: This picture was taken in 1974, looking south on NW 1st Avenue from NW 4th Street, showing the metal cover, in the sidewalk corner, of the Crazy Well. It is full of Crazy water, ready to be pumped out and used. The building on the left is the west side of the present [2008] Crazy Water Retirement Hotel. This information was taken from Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", page 29. This well was the third one dug in Mineral Wells.
Date: 1974
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]

Description: A bottle-shaped flier is illustrated here, showing the attractions and services in Mineral Wells. Evidently, this is the interior of the flier. See "Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad" for the cover. All hotels, boarding houses, wells, and activities are listed, including fox hunting. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Ad].
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Texas Carlsbad Water

Description: A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph.
Date: 1895?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Texas Carlsbad Water

Description: This photograph illustrates the Texas Carlsbad Well at Mineral Wells, Texas, one of the early drinking pavilions in the "City built on water." It was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. Shown here is an early picture of the Carlsbad, as later views show slight additions and alterations in response to competition among drinking pavilions for business.
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: Shown here is another picture of the Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas. The Carlsbad was one of the early mineral water drinking pavilions in "the city built on water," located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad was on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway Line. Gasoline-powered trolleys, known as the "Dinky Cars", operated at 15-minute intervals between Mineral Wells and Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1909.
Date: 1905?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Gibson Well

Description: The discovery of mineral water, and its reported healing powers, sparked an influx of health-seeking visitors in 1881-82. A flurry of drilling activity resulted in incorporation of the city of Mineral Wells in 1882, as water was sought to satisfy the booming market; so much so that no one remembers the order in which the wells were drilled. The Gibson well, however, was one of the early ones. Located at 705 NW 2nd Avenue, it grew into one of the largest parks and drinking pavilions in town. The gasoline-powered "Dinky cars" of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway passed by it every quarter-hour, from 1905 to 1909, on their journeys to and from Lake Pinto. The Gibson property was acquired by the Crazy. It was known as the Crazy Park in 1938, and it was made into a beautiful botanical garden. It is currently the site of the First Christian Church.
Date: 1910?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Star Well (Winter Scene)

Description: "Winter Scene--Shipping Star Well Water--From Min Wells Texas" The Star Well was located at the northeast corner of the intersection of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue, across the street and north of the Baker Hotel. The telephone building is currently [2008] located there. A "date", handwritten on the bottom right corner of image, reads--possibly--"1899", which would explain the unpaved street and the lack of automobiles.
Date: 1899?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Well-Reamer

Description: Patent for an improved well-reamer with a more stable and supported cutters to straighten or increase the size of the hole with less damage from wear.
Date: May 18, 1915
Creator: Hughes, Howard R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grapple

Description: Patent for grapple for use with wells. This invention is designed to grip objects inside of drilled wells. Illustration included.
Date: October 2, 1906
Creator: Williams, Frank S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"

Description: This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four.
Date: 1905?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Double-Acting Pump

Description: Patent for a pump that obtains a supply of fluid from both strokes of the piston and delivers the fluid through a continuous stream. Illustrations included.
Date: August 30, 1910
Creator: Arnold, Henry Brown
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department