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Breckenridge City Offices

Description: Photograph of the Breckenridge City Offices. There is a flag pole in front of the building, as well as two potted plants. Cars are parked in the far right side of the photo.
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Memorial - Texas Civil War Frontier Defense 1861 -1865

Description: Photograph of a Civil War memorial in Breckenridge, Texas. It reads: "Texas Civil War Frontier Defense (1861 - 1865). Texas made an all-out effort for the Confederacy after voting over 3 to 1 for secession. 90,000 troops, noted for mobility and heroic daring, fought on every battlefront. An important source of supply and gateway to foreign trade thru Mexico, Texas was the storehouse of the south. Camp Breckenridge and other posts on this line were backed by patrols of state rangers, organized militia, and citizens posses scouting from nearby "family forts". This was part of a 2000 mile frontier and coastline successfully defended by Texans."
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Stone Building]

Description: Photograph of a two-story stone building in Albany, Texas. There are cars to the right, and trees and cactus plants are visible in front of the building.
Date: unknown
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Blach Building, erected 1884, doorway detail

Description: Photograph of the doorway to the Blach Building in Albany, Texas. The building is painted green, with red and white trim. There are two plaques to the right of the door that explain what the building is. The words "Shackelford County Tax Office" have been painted in both windows, and papers have been taped into the doors. There is a wooden ceiling fan above the door.
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Shackelford County

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Shackelford County. First inhabited by nomadic Indian tribes, Shackelford County was created in 1858 and named for Dr. John Shackelford (1790-1857). The first permanent Anglo-American settlers in this area included J. C. Lynch (1828-1912), a native of Ireland who moved here in 1858; W. H. Ledbetter (1833-84), who arrived in 1859 and later started the Ledbetter Salt Works; T. E. Jackson (b.1820), a merchant who settled in the northern part of the county before 1860; and G. W. Greer (1812-93), who operated a stage station on Hubbard Creek after 1861. During the Civil War (1861-1865), settlers took refuge at "family forts" such as Fort Mugginsville and Fort Hubbard. They gained military protection from frontier perils when the U. S. Army established Fort Griffin in 1867. Griffin, the lawless settlement that grew up around the Fort, attracted buffalo hide hunters and cattlemen driving herds up the western cattle trail. Shackelford County was organized Sept. 12, 1874, with Fort Griffin as temporary county seat. Albany was chosen permanent county seat in Nov. 1874. The county's population increased sharply after the arrival of the Texas Central Railroad in 1881. Petroleum production generated an economic boom, 1910-30. Chief industries today (1976) are petroleum and ranching. (1976)"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, Hartfield Building

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "Hartfield Building. Charles A. Hartfield purchased the lot on this site in 1881. A noted area cook, he quickly established "Charley's Restaurant," which included a bakery and boardinghouse. Hartfield was so successful that he planned an elegant rock structure in which to house his business. Construction began in March 1884 amid a flurry of development in the area. Scottish stonemason Patrick McDonnell, who was responsible for much of the stonework on the new courthouse, was foreman for the Hartfield worksite. The project's scope proved too grand for Hartfield's finances, however, and in September of 1884 he sold the building to J. C. Lynch. Financially ruined, Hartfield was found dead within the year. Lynch sold his building in 1885 to three Albany businessmen: Max Blach, N. H. Burns and Sam Webb. Charles Hartfield's widow, Lettie Hartfield, joined them as an equal partner and the group completed the structure, probably using Charles Hartfield's original plans. The building was occupied over time by such businesses as a grocery, a general merchandise store, a bowling alley and an auto repair shop. The Albany Masonic Lodge began meeting in the structure as early as 1893, and it became known as "The Masonic Building" to local residents. Real Estate magnate L. H. Hill purchased the building in 1925, and the masonic lodge bought it in 1940. Damage from nesting bats caused part of the buildings limestone front to tumble into the street in 1954. The Masons took down the facade and rebuilt it with yellow brick. Sold again in 1996, the building was renovated and its facade reconstructed to reflect its former grandeur as one of Albany's finest early structures. (2000)"
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic Plaque, White Elephant Saloon (Blach Building)

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Albany, Texas. It reads: "White Elephant Saloon (Blach Building). The land on this site, Lot 9, Block 3 of the original town plat of Albany, was purchased in 1882 by noted local restauranteur Charles Hartfield. He planned to build a restaurant next door, and the pending establishment was much anticipated by local diners. Shortly before his death in 1884, Hartfield sold the lot to Alabama businessman Max Blach. Blach was vice-president of the Albany Water Company. He and partner N. H. Burns brought a system of running water to the town in 1884. Blach began construction on this one-story native stone structure in March 1884. The building was completed in April and leased to J. R. Davis, who put it to its most infamous use. The White Elephant Saloon opened for business on May 1, 1884. Among its instantly popular features was a white elephant display which was removed from the rooftop early in the establishments heyday. The perpetrators were believed to be citizens who disapproved of the saloon's raucous business. Despite its popularity, Davis announced his intent to close the saloon in February 1886. The Blach building soon was leased to W. M. Wigley, who operated a dry goods and furniture store on this site. Succeeding furniture businesses occupied the building for many years. Blach's heirs sold the structure to S. C. Coffee in 1919. Coffee sold it in 1923 to T. J. Crow, who conveyed it to Albany businessman L. H. Hill (1859-1932) in 1925. The structure was used for various purposes over the years: it was the home of the Albany News in the 1940s and was the workshop and office of a pipe organ maker in the 1950s and 1960s. The Hill family maintained ownership of the edifice until 1977. …
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Alley in Breckenridge

Description: Photograph of an alley scene in Breckenridge, Texas. There is a green dumpster to the far left of the photograph. Next to it is a white sign with black lettering that says "One Way Do Not Enter." A car drives through the alley. A fire escape can be seen on the third building in the background.
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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