The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 21, July 1917 - April, 1918

The Southwestern Historical Quarterly

is especially valuable because it assembles data and information
which anyone interested in the single tax has had difficulty in
obtaining.
Some of his readers may disagree with Professor Young in
the influence which he accords to Henry George and single taxers
in the recent popularization of political economy. Changing eco-
nomic conditions, such as the disappearance of free land, the
growth of trusts, and the rise of prices, and the socialist move-
ment are perhaps more influential than the single tax agitation.
At the same time, the single tax is no-t to be unduly minimized,
and in giving us an adequate and readable history of the move-
ment Professor Young has done a most useful piece of work.
The University of Texas. E. T. MILLER.
Our Hispanic Southwest. By Ernest Peixotto, with illustrations
by the author. (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1916.
Pp. xx, 245.)
This book is not history but it gives some interesting facts
about historic places. The illustrations are numerous, artistic,
and apt. The language is ornate to, a fault. It reads like a
booster circular for a pleasure resort. If the entire book were
confined to places along or near one railway system, as about
half of it is, one might think it was a railroad advertising scheme
in disguise. It will doubtless have the effect of stimulating
travel through the Southwest. For the traveler in that region it
will serve as a convenient guide-book to the most interesting his-
toric places. Interspersed among the lengthy, extravagant, and
tedious descriptions are a, few important historic facts. The
author has enjoyed close association with some of the best his-
torians of the Southwest, and has studied, at least superficially,
some very important primary historic material. No historian will
go to this book for the facts of history, though with few excep-
tions it is true to the facts; but as a stimulus to, the study of the
history of the Southwest it is of value for those who do not find
proximity irksome. The historic places described are New Or-
leans, San Antonio, El Paso, San Xavier del Bac, the Grand
Cafion, Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and nearby places.
W. R. M.

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Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 21, July 1917 - April, 1918. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101073/. Accessed December 19, 2014.