The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 65, July 1961 - April, 1962

Book Reviews

and Most Rev. L. J. Reicher, Bishop of Austin, in whose custody
the archives found a home, and the Bishop of Corpus Christi, Most
Rev. Mariano Garriga, the latter being one of the most energetic
promoters of the work, without whose consistent help and guid-
ance the dream of the original planners of Our Catholic Heritage
in Texas, 1519-1936 could never have been written, and the Cath-
olic Archives of Texas could not have been established. It is to
be hoped that Sister M. Claude Lane's fascinating story of the
founding of the Catholic Archives of Texas will soon find a pub-
lisher willing to print it in a more attractive form than multi-
lith, and that her message will find its way to the generous heart
of some Texas philanthropist who is able and willing to provide
the Archives with a fitting modern up to date home in the city
of Austin and endow it with sufficient funds to assure its avail-
ability for present and future scholars with a staff of competent
and devoted librarians such as Sister M. Claude Lane. In such
event the valuable collection could be kept current and become
the permanent and completely up to date Catholic Archives of
Texas. HENRY B. DIELMANN
"Remember the Alamo." By Albert Curtis. San Antonio (The
Clegg Co., Printers), 1961. Pp. 72. Photographs, sketches,
maps. $2.00.
"Remember the Alamo," a paper-bound booklet by Albert Cur-
tis of San Antonio, is another contribution to the large and ever-
growing body of literature inspired by the famous shrine of
Texas liberty.
This modest little book has its good points, though marred by
poor arrangement of material and by the curious and somewhat
irritating mannerisms of the author.
A few words first about the good points. There is a section of
full-page photographs displaying the old and the new close to-
gether; for example, in this order, James Bowie, Davy Crockett,
President Kennedy and Vice-President Johnson at the Alamo,
Richard and Pat Nixon also paying their respects at the shrine,
and four views from the film, The Alamo. Inside the back cover
are two fascinating sketches of the Alamo, one in 1837 and the
other in 1845. There are two maps.

613

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 65, July 1961 - April, 1962. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101195/. Accessed July 28, 2014.