The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963

Notes and Documents

459

cedo sent a flag requesting permission to bury their dead, which
occupied them until after night. When the Americans rose the next
morning, there was not an enemy to be seen-they had all abandoned
their quarters and marched for San Antonio during the night-and
by noon there were three hundred deserters from the enemy arrived
at the fort and joined the Americans.86 The loss of the Americans
during the seige and in this closely contested battle for six hours, was
eight men killed and about thirty wounded.88 Their loss in killed
was the previously noticed two, on picket guard, barbarously muti-
lated-one on horse guard,"7 and three in this last and decisive con-
flict; in which the enemy's loss must have been very great. Their
priest, who acted as chaplain during the seige, which the Americans
found at San Antonio, became very friendly, and communicative,
with them, stated that the enemy lost six hundred men during the
seige. Major Ross was sent on a mission to the Cooshattie Indians,
on the Trinity.88 He proceeded to Nacogdoches, where he found a
the mud-wattled Jacals were torn down after the "Battle of the White Cow" in
November. The fighting for this post was led by Captain Gormley and it changed
hands three or four times. Villars adds that it was foggy until about noon, that
artillery was active on both sides, that the American loss was small and that about
150 prisoners joined the republican ranks, being sworn in by Antonio Flores. Hall.
The Mexican War of Independence in Texas, 1812-13, in Gulick and others, Lamar
Papers, IV, Pt. 1, 279; Information derived from John Villars, ibid., VI, 150.
8Hall states that Salcedo remained in his camp for about ten days before
starting his retreat to San Antonio. Villars says that he remained for some time
as the Americans harrassed his lines every night. Gutierrez says that the Spanish
camps were found deserted on the morning of the 19th and this is supported by
an unknown correspondent of Sibley. Hall. The Mexican War of Independence in
Texas, 1812-13, ibid., IV, Pt. 1, 279; Informaton derived from John Villars, ibid.,
VI, 150; Gutierrez to Ross, February 24, 1813, included with Shaler to Monroe,
March 13, 1813, and unknown to Sibley, March 5, 1813, included with Shaler to
Monroe, April 3, 1813, Shaler Papers.
8"Throughout the papers dealing with this expedition there is great discrepancy
in the casualty figures given. This probably is because some witnesses reported
only the losses among the Americans, as McLane does here, while others included
those of the Mexican rebels, while still others included both Mexicans and Indians.
For this last battle, Gutierrez reports two Americans killed and eleven slightly
wounded, Sibley's unknown correspondent agrees. On the other hand, Fisher,
adjutant of the expedition, reports one American and one Mexican killed and
eleven slightly wounded, and gives the cumulative figures as fifteen killed and
dead of wounds. Gutierrez to Ross, February 24, 1813, and Fisher to unknown,
February 13, 1813, included with Shaler to Monroe, March 13, 1813; unknown to
Sibley, March 5, 1813, included with Shaler to Monroe, April 3, 1813, Shaler Papers.
8'The cumulative totals here given are one of the key points in identifying
Colonel McLane as author of this narrative, through Thrall, Pictorial History of
Texas.
88Shaler reports that Ross left La Bahia on December 22 and arrived at Nacogdo-
ches on January 9, 1813, not after the final battle as indicated by the text. Ac-
cording to John Henry Brown, Ross was sent out essentially to contradict rumors

Texas State Historical Association. The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Volume 66, July 1962 - April, 1963. Austin, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth101196/. Accessed July 22, 2014.