The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane

68 CRY OF DISTRESS IN GALVESTON.
The organization of forces under the able administration of
General Scurry was observable on every hand, and the chaotic
condition of the city was being supplanted by a vigor of action
that portended restoration in the near future. Private enterprise
went to work and the people took heart.
NURSES FROM A DISTANCE.
The very presence of nurses was a sign that the calamity had
attracted the attention of the world at large, and the city would
not be left to succumb to the dire and terrible disaster that has
overtaken it.
One of the local journals said: " Merchants are cleaning up
their stores and repairing their injured buildings; property
owners are seeking everywhere to obtain men and materials with
which to restore their shattered habitations. Hope has by no
means departed. In a brief time the sound of the locomotive will
be heard upon the island, freight will be pouring up to the ship's
side, and the mechanic and artisan will find remunerative employment
for years to come. Out of the destruction of the greatest wind
and tide force that ever played upon the American continent, there
has arisen already a feeling that what a week ago was regarded
as an irretrievable disaster, will yet prove the starting point of a
remodelled and reinvigorated Galveston. The whole world is
behind us in generous sympathy and noble beneficence."
GOVERNOR SAYRES ON THE SITUATION.
Governor Sayres made the following statement to the Associated
Press on the flood situation :
"Conditions at Galveston are fully as bad as reported. Communication,
however, has been re-established between the island
and the mainland, and hereafter transportation of supplies will be
less difficult. The work of clearing the city is progressing fairly
well, and Adjutant General Scurry, under direction of the Mayor,
is patrolling the city for the purpose of preventing depredations.
The most conservative estimate as to the number of dead places
them at 2,000. Contributions from citizens of this State and also
from other States are coming in rapidly and liberally, and it is

Lester, Paul. The great Galveston disaster, containing a full and thrilling account of the most appalling calamity of modern times including vivid descriptions of the hurricane. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26719/. Accessed August 20, 2014.