History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

450 HITR FTXS

farm iie also owns timber and pasture land.
Mr. Insall was married in DeWitt county,
October 12, 1854, to Sarah, a daughter of
Norman Woods, who was captured by the
Mexicans at the time of Dawson's defeat, and
died in prison at Perote. Our subject and
wife have had eleven children, viz.: Norman,
of Leander, this county; Robert, also of this
city; Mary, wife of W. K. Humble, of
Leander; Alice, wife of Edward McClure, of
Coleman county, Texas; Ellen, now Mrs.
John M. McDaniel, of Burnet county; Ida,
wife of W. T. Jennings, of Leander; Herbert,
Lillie, Eric, Eugene and Hugh at home. In
his political relations Mr. Insall votes with
the Democratic party, and, fraternally, is a
Master Mason.
T ARON SEYMOUR, a farmer of Williamson
county, is a son of G. W. and
Sarah (Uticto) Seymour, of English
and Irish descent. Isaac Seymour
came to America before the Revolutionary
war and located in Virginia. At the opening
of that struggle he entered the Continental
army. Three other brothers of this
family came tq America as British soldiers;
two were captured in the first fight and the
other deserted. The three then entered the
American army. The father of our subject
was born, reared and married in Virginia,
subsequently moved to Knox county, Ten.
nessee, later to Buchanan county, Missouri,
and about twenty-five years later located in
Georgetown, Williamson county, Texas, but
in 1861 removed to Leavenworth county,
Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour were the
parents of four children: Amanda, wif of
Sidney Richardson, of High Prairie, Leavenworth
county, Kansas; John S., of Buchanan

county, Missouri; Thomas Madison, of St.
Joseph, that State; and Aaron, our subject.
The mother died when the youngest child
was four years of age, and the father afterward
married a Mrs. Russell. Both still reside
in Leavenworth county, Kansas. Mr.
Seymour was formerly engaged in farming,
but is now a merchant of Boling.
Aaron Seymour was bprn in Knox county,
Tennessee, August 29, 1839. After his
mother's death he made his home with
Thomas Dittimore, a friend of his father,
until twelve years of age, when he came with
his father to Texas. In 1851 he went to
Kansas, but two years later returned to this
State. Our subject then entered Strahorn's
cavalry company, afterward Company D,
Thirtieth Texas Regiment, under Colonel
Gurly, was appointed Second Sergeant, and
served in the Trans-Mississippi department.
He participated in the battles of Roseville,
Prairie de Han, Poison Springs, Saline river
and Cabin creek. After the close of the
struggle he returned to Williamson county,
since which time he has been engaged in
agricultural pursuits. He first located six
miles north of Georgetown; eleven years later
removed to a farm seven miles northeast of
that place; five years later went to Corn Hill,
and in 1890 purchased his present farm of
550 acres, which is located twenty miles
northwest of Georgetown, and 140 acres of
which are cultivated. In addition to his
farming he also gives considerable attention
to stock-raising.
Mr. Seymour was married in Williamson
county, in 1859, to Sarah E. Donnell. They
have had ten children: Martha V., wife of
Dr. W. P. Masterson, of Corn Hill; America
0., wife of V. B. Brewster, also of that
place; Florrie W., at home; Apton A., deceased;
Marvin H., Barnett E., Myrtle M.,

450

HI~STORY F EXS

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 2, 2014.