History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

HISTORY OF T E X A S.7 6 5

of Arkansas, and the latter of Alabama. The
father was engaged as a Methodist minister
many years, and his last charge was in McLennan
county. The parents reared a family
of four children: William, our subject; Lucy,
wife of G. W. Kinchelo, a merchant of
Bruceville, Texas; Emily, wife of C. G. Bratton,
a merchant of Coosa; and John, a Western
Union telegraph operator at Kansas City.
William W. Morris, tile subject of this
sketch, came with his parents to Texas in
1868, locating first in Cherokee county,
where his mother died in 1870. In the same
year he went to Hill county, where he attended
the common schools, and completed
his education at Georgetown. In 1878 Mr.
Morris returned to Hill county, where he
improved a farm, but in the following fall
he sold his place and came to Corn Hill,
Williamson county. He continued farming
and stock-raising here until 1887, when he
embarked in the mercantile trade, and is now
the oldest and leading merchant of the place.
Since residing in this county he has served
as Deputy Sheriff four years.
Mr. Morris was married in the fall of
1878, to Alice King, who was born in Corn
Hill, February 17, 1858, a daughter of Judge
J. E. King, of Belton, Texas, and a granddaughter
of Isaac Bunker. The latter obtained
the certificate of the league of land on
which Corn Hill is now located, for services
rendered the State before annexation. J. E.
King married a Miss Bunker, purchased the
interest of the remaining heirs, and came in
possession of the above mentioned land,
where he made a large farm and laid off and
.named the town. He moved to Salado, Texas,
in 1873, to educate his children, and five
years later returned to his farm. Since 1890
he has resided in Belton. Mr. King is a
public spirited man, has given land for

churches, colleges, etc., and has served as
County Judge and in many other positions.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris have six children:
Joseph K., born September 18, 1881; Samunel
D., February 24, 1883; W. W., June 18,
1885; Alice S., October 5, 1887; John E.,
in January, 1889; and Jackson, March 1,
1891. Mr. Morris affiliates with the I. 0.
0. F., and is a Democrat in his political
views, and both he and and his wife are members
of the Methodist Church.
ft NDREW HAMILTON, a successful
farmer of Williamson county, is a son
of Ninian and Sarah (Woods) Hamilton.
The grandfather our subject,
Ninian Hamilton, was a native of Scotland,
and came to this country before the Revolutionary
war, in which he served as Captain of
a company. After the close of. the struggle
he located in Kentucky, where the father of
our subject was born and raised. When a
young man the latter went to Missouri, was
among the early pioneers of that State, was
married in St. Louis county, in 1802, and his
death occurred there in 1845. His wife departed
this life in 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton
were the parents of fifteen children, all of
whom are now deceased but the subject of
this sketch and one brothers, Thoma W., of
Rockport, Texas.
Andrew Hamilton was born in St. Louis
county, Missouri, February 21, 1827, and remained
at home until reaching manhood. In
1853 he located on his present farm of 400
acres in Williamson county, Texas, situated
at the head of Dry Brushy creek, four miles
west of Leander, where he has 200 acres
under good cultivation. Mr. Hamilton is
engaged in general farming and stock-raising.

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Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed September 20, 2014.