History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families

A 780 HISTORY OP TEXAS.

1862, he enlisted in Company A, served as
a private until the close of the struggle, re--
nmained on this side of the river, and took
part in many battles and skirmishes. After
the close of hostilities, Mr. Hodges purchased
a farm and worked at farm labor for a time, and
was then elected County Assessor and Collector,
holding that position until removed
by the Reconstruction Act. For the following
five years he was engaged in farming;
from 1872 to 1882 followed general merchandising
in Georgetown; in the latter year
was elected County Clerk, and re-elected in
1892. Mr. Hodges is an accomplished and
pleasant officer, and his continous re-election
to the same office for so long a period evinces
the high esteem in which he is held by an
appreciative constituency.
November 14, 1854, our subject was
united in marriage with Miss Emily Rucker,
a daughter of Captain John Rucker, of
Grainger county, Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs.
Hodges have had five children, namely:
John, deceased at the age of twenty-two
years, was a graduate of the Louisville Medical
College, a practicing physician in this
county, was a young doctor of great promise,
and had a bright future awaiting him;
Beulah H., wife of W. W. Dim nitt, a
farmer of Williamson county, and they have
two children-Lilburn and James H.; Cornie,
who died December 23, 1891, aged twentyone
years, was a graduate of a New York
school of elocution, and was a fine elocutionist;
James F., who has been assisting his
father for the past four years; and Oliver, a
pupil of the Southwestern University, who
will soon begin the study of medicine. Mr.
and Mrs. Hodges are members of the 'Methodist
Episcopal Church, South, in which the
former is a Steward. He is a member of the
blue lodge, chapter and commandery, and is

Treasurer of the two former, and has been
a delegate to the Grand Lodge of the I. 0.
0. F. As an officer Mr. Hodges has no
superior in the State; as a citizen he stands
deservedly well and is kind and courteous
to all.
E DWIN R. ANDERSON, a carpenter
and farmer by occupation, was the
- first white child born in Williamson
county, March 5, 1847. His parents were
Dr. W. R. and Nancy P. (Knight) Anderson,
the former a native of Kentucky and the
latter of Ohio. The father was a son of
William and Patsey Anderson, who moved to
Monroe county, Indiana, in about 1818.
While there they were many times quartered
in blockhouses to protect them from the
Indians. They were the parents of fourteen
children, all of whom lived to be grown.
Milton went to California in L850; Irvin
came to Texas in 1879 or 1880; and the
remainder were scattered through the Northern
States, but none are now living.
W. R. Anderson, father of our subject,
and a physician and surgeon by occupation,
left Illinois in 1845, arriving in Ruttersville,
Fayette county, Texas, in the fall of 1845,
and on Brushy creek, Williamson county, the
following year. He followed his profession
and farming there until 1854, and in that
year embarked in the drug business in
Georgetown. During the last ten years of
his life he was retired from active business,
and his death occurred in Georgetown,
November 22, 1889, aged seventy-nine years.
Dr. Anderson served one term as Probate
Judge of his county, was a member of the
Presbyterian Church for many years, and
was a Union man throughout the war. He

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a 780

Lewis Publishing Company, publisher. History of Texas, together with a biographical history of Milam, Williamson, Bastrop, Travis, Lee and Burleson counties : containing a concise history of the state, with portraits and biographies of prominent citizens of the above named counties, and personal histories of many of the early settlers and leading families. Chicago. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29785/. Accessed July 10, 2014.