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 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2006
DAR honors Ernestine Thompson
Announcement for the reception when the Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.) honored Ernestine Thompson with the Community Service Award at the W.H. Passon Historical Society on May 21, 2006. Ernestine collected artifacts for the Jacob Fontaine Religious Museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17355/
Ernestine Thompson receiving community service award from D.A.R.
The Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.)representative, Nancy Tanner, honors Ernestine Thompson with the Community Service Award at the W.H. Passon Historical Society on May 21, 2006. Ernestine collected artifacts for the Jacob Fontaine Religious Museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17357/
David and Dorothy Peterson home in Hitchcock
David and Dorothy Peterson home in Hitchcock, Texas, located at 8029 Neville. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18537/
R.L. Bond home in Hitchcock
R.L. Bond home in Hitchcock, Texas. Formerly the Hepler home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18543/
Robert Hunter home in Hitchcock
Robert Hunter home in Hitchcock, Texas. The home was built in 1901 by Mr. Hunter's Grandfather, Howard Layton Roberts. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18538/
Jacob Fontaine Religious Museum
The Jacob Fontaine Religious Museum at the new location, 1195 Comal St. In the 1880s this was a one-room school house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17356/
[Dr. Carolyn Salter]
Carolyn Salter was elected in 2005 as the first female Mayor of Palestine. Photograph of a woman in a suit in front of a governmental seal and an American Flag. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9805/
[George Foss]
George Foss served as Mayor of Palestine from 2001 until 2005. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9828/
1875 Jail
The old 1875 Clay County jail which was relocated and is now on the rodeo grounds. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16492/
1890 Jail Museum
1890 Clay County Jail Museum with period furnishings, artifacts, and gallows. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16504/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18532/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18531/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18530/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - flying displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Flying displays of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18526/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - hangar displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Hangar displays of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18524/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - Static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static displays of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18527/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static display of a Lockheed aircraft. A gentleman wearing a fedora stands by the tail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18519/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static displays of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18525/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - Static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static display of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18528/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static displays of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18523/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static displays of aircraft texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18522/
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony - static displays
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static displays of aircraft. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18520/
Linda Finch with her Lockheed L-10A Electra at the Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Static displays of aircraft. A woman in a flight suit talks with a gentleman in front of a plane. This is Linda Finch of San Antonio, who in 1997 faithfully recreated the ill-fated last flight of Amelia Earhart. Finch's effort became known as "World Flight 1997," and is the only retracing of Earhart's last flight that incorporated an aircraft almost identical to Earhart's Lockheed L-10 Electra aircraft. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18521/
Lockheed L-10A Electra at the Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Ceremony
Camp Wallace Marker Dedication Service. Hangar displays with people standing around an airplane. This is Linda Finch's airplane in which she faithfully recreated the ill-fated last flight of Amelia Earhart. Finch's effort became known as "World Flight 1997," and is the only retracing of Earhart's last flight that incorporated an aircraft almost identical to Earhart's Lockheed L-10 Electra aircraft. Finch can be seen in the left side of the frame, speaking with some onlookers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18529/
[Robert McKelvey]
Robert McKelvey served as Mayor of Palestine from 1997 until 2001. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9813/
[Joe Meyer]
Joe Meyer served as Mayor of Palestine from 1995 until 1997. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9811/
[100 Block W. Kolstad]
Photo of the 100 block of W. Kolstad. Houses from the left to right are 119, 117, and 115 W. Kolstad. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9442/
[100 S. Sycamore - Pearlstone Grocery Company]
This building is one of the relatively few historic warehouses to survive in Palestine. The building is indicative of how little stylistic ornamentation was applied to buildings that were used for utilitarian purposes. The building does have paired, double-hung windows set within segmented arches and vertical brick piers that define the bays. The Davidson-Pearlstone Grocery Company was in operation at this site for several years following its formation in 1899. In 1904 local businessman Hyman Pearlstone bought the controlling interest and renamed the company. According to local historians, J.T. Sweetman bought an interest in the firm in 1905. The Pearlstone Grocery Company opened in this building in January 1913. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9412/
[107 E. Kolstad - Gaught House]
This house is an anomaly among historic residences in Palestine and defies classification. Local contractor John H. Gaught built this house in the early 1910’s, to plans by prominent architect James F. Brook. Gaught was responsible for the construction of some of Palestine’s most notable buildings, including the Redlands Hotel and the Centenary Methodist Church. According to deed records, Gaught sold the house to John R. Hearne, Jr., in January 1914. Hearne was a salesman at the Palestine Hardware Company who lived here with his wife, Clara Welborn, until 1945, when W.T. Lively acquired the building. Lively continued to occupy the house through 1971, and was responsible for the building’s rear addition. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9429/
[111 Angelina - Pentecom LLC]
Located at the northwest corner of Angelina and Royall streets, it was at one time the Medical Center Pharmacy. As of August 2006, the building houses the offices of Pentecom LLC. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9422/
[200 Block S. Magnolia]
This photo was taken from the west side of S. Magnolia Street, just south of the railroad tracks, with the camera facing north. The houses are (from right to left) 216 S. Magnolia, 212 S. Magnolia, 208 S. Magnolia (Verda's Flower Shop) and 204 S. Magnolia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9425/
[201 W. Crawford - Denby Bldg]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Denby Building," located at 201 W. Crawford in downtown Palestine, Texas. It is a three-story brick building, classified as a "Two-Part Commercial Block," that has grouped pivoting windows on the upper floors, and side-facing brickwork in the parapet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9399/
[209-211 W. Kolstad - Grace Methodist Church]
This property is one of thirteen historic churches in Palestine. The building occupies a prominent corner lot, making the church a prominent landmark in the residential neighborhood north of the city’s central business district. The church displays Classical Revival features, and the most notable architectural element is the elliptical archway in the brickwork façade. This church, alternately called Grace Methodist Church and Grace Methodist Episcopal Church in early city directories, was built on this site in 1916 by contractor Will Pheifer. There has been a practicing Methodist congregation in Palestine since 1850; the earliest members met in Bascom’s Chapel, an extant building since converted into a private dwelling located at 812 N. Mallard. During the mid-1910’s the congregation split, with some members forming this church and others forming the First United Methodist Church, located on S. Magnolia. Sometime before 2006, it changed hands and is now the One Way Apostolic Faith Holy Temple Headquarters. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9437/
[213 W. Main - Robinson State Bank Building]
Photograph of the front of the "Robinson State Bank Building" located at 213 W. Main in Palestine, Texas. The building is made of red brick with Romanesque Revival detailing and is classified as a One-Part Commercial Block. It has a rectangular plan with load-bearing masonry construction, a 3-bay façade that displays elaborate brickwork, a large round archway marking the primary entrance, and a stepped, 3-part parapet with corbelling. A neon sign near the entrance says "Rushing Jewelers, Home of Lucky Forever Diamond Rings." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9398/
[220 W. Reagan - Grant House]
Photograph of the northwest corner of the "Grant House," a two-story, Queen Anne-style house located at 220 W. Reagan (on the corner of W. Reagan and S. May streets) in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9406/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the northeast corner of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. This photo was taken from the corner of south Magnolia and west Bowers streets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9421/
[310 E. Crawford - Gatewood Shelton Gin Building]
Photograph of one corner of the "Gatewood-Shelton Gin" building, located at 310 E. Crawford in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story metal-clad structure without stylistic ornamentation, that faces north onto E. Crawford Street, just beyond the northern limits of Palestine’s historic downtown texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9400/
[315 E. Kolstad - Greenwood House]
During the late 19th and very early 20th centuries, the Queen Anne style enjoyed considerable popularity locally, especially among more affluent citizens. This large, 2-story frame residence is one such example, although the application of asbestos siding over the wood siding detracts from the property’s overall historic character. Other than the new siding, the house appears to have changed little since its construction in 1903. Judge Thomas Benton Greenwood (1832-1900) and his wife Lucy Henry Gee built a one-story house on this site in the 1870s, which later was enlarged into the present 2-story building around the turn of the century. A native of Mississippi and a Confederate veteran, Mr. Greenwood was a prominent Palestine lawyer during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. In 1872 he formed a law partnership with John Young Gooch (later a state senator); subsequently, the two men formed a law firm with John H. Reagan, the former Postmaster General of the Confederacy and U.S. congressman. Dr. Bethune F. McDonald, a physician and surgeon with offices at 103 ½ W. Oak, purchased this house in 1935. He and his wife Josephine continued to live here through the early 1940s, when Mr. McDonald died. Mrs. McDonald lived in the house until 1960, when the building was purchased by Richard and June Handorf. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9426/
[400 Block S. Sycamore]
This picture was taken while standing at the intersection of Dallas and S. Sycamore streets, looking northeast at the houses on S. Sycamore street. The houses are (from left to right) 408 S. Sycamore, 412 S. Sycamore, 416 S. Sycamore and the last house on the right is no longer there. I do not know what the address of that house was. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9423/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9395/
[401 W. Main - G. E. Dilley Building]
Photograph of the front and side of the "Dilley Building," a two-story, brick building located at 401 W. Main in Palestine, Texas. It has a rectangular plan and load-bearing masonry walls with Victorian Italianate-style details, including an elaborately detailed parapet on the façade and the segmental-arched hoodmolds on the second floors of the south and east elevations. It is classified as a Two-Part Commercial Block building, and is part of Palestine’s central business district. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9397/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9435/
[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]
Photograph of the front of the "Hearne House," a 2 1/2-story house located at 503 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a corner tower with a conical roof on the southwest corner and a 2-tiered porch with turned balustrades. This photo was taken from the street, looking up the front walk toward the house; the front yard is open and there are planters near the start and end of the front walk as well as large trees on either side of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9439/
[511 Royall - Reagan / Ferguson House]
This modest, center-passage dwelling presents another good illustration of how many late 19th century homeowners applied stylistic ornamentation to a vernacular house form. This 1-story frame residence has a front-facing gable extension and porch with turned-wood columns and jigsawn brackets, all of which are suggestive of the Queen Anne style. Rear additions are not only relatively unobtrusive to the building’s original appearance, but they also reflect the property’s physical evolution and are important architectural features. John H. Reagan built this house in the 1880s for his daughter, Bettie Reagan Ferguson, and his son-in-law, Alexander Ferguson. Mr. Ferguson was postmaster of Palestine from 1886-1890. The dwelling was later the home of the couple’s daughter, Bess Ferguson, who taught in the Palestine schools and was a librarian at the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9408/
[601 E. Hodges - Elmwood]
Photograph of the front and west side of "Elmwood," a white, two-story house located at 601 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. The house has a wrap-around porch and a two-story pedimented portico with Ionic-style columns; these elements altered the original Queen Anne-style architecture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9438/
[638 S. Magnolia - Silliman House]
This 2-story dwelling is an excellent illustration of the Georgian Revival style, an early 20th century architectural form rarely found in Palestine. This house is further distinguished by its load-bearing walls, which are a contrast to the prevailing wood-frame construction used on most domestic buildings in Palestine. Noted architect and New Jersey-native James Frith Brook (who was responsible for numerous Palestine buildings, including the Redlands Hotel), designed this house for Dr. J. Calvin Silliman in 1911. C.S. Maffitt was the contractor, but some also believe that he was the architect, instead of Mr. Brook. The story goes that the foundation for the house was installed and had to stand for several months before construction on the dwelling could begin. The outside brick walls were constructed first and then the inside studs and walls were built. The carriage house, located in back, dates back to the first owners of the lot, a Dr. Swinney, whose home was moved to allow for the building of this home. Silliman sold the house to his cousin, John H. Silliman in 1915, when he moved his family to California. A Mississippi native, J.H. Silliman was the proprietor of Silliman and Company – a Palestine business founded in 1871, and one of the largest hardware stores in the region. Silliman married Laura Brook, the architect’s daughter, in 1920 and they lived here until sometime in the 1940’s. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Willis purchased the property from the Silliman’s and they lived there until 1973, when it was sold to the Bailey family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9420/
[700 Block S. Sycamore]
Photograph of the west side of the 700 Block of S. Sycamore from the intersection of S. Sycamore Street and Neches Streets, looking toward the north. The houses in the picture are (from left to right) 717 S. Sycamore and 713 S. Sycamore. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9424/
[805 S. Sycamore - George Edward Dilley House]
Photograph of the front (east side) of the "George Edward Dilley House" located at 805 S. Sycamore, in Palesine, Texas. The house is two stories and has a wrap-around porch with decorative woodwork, as well as a mansard roof and a widow's walk with cast iron handrails. The yard is enclosed by a decorative metal fence. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9418/
[814 S. Sycamore - Pennybacker Campbell House]
Photograph of the front of the "Pennybacker Campbell House," a 2 ½-story, white, frame, Queen Anne-style house located at 814 S. Sycamore in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9415/
[839 N. Tennessee]
Photograph of a one-story, white, L-plan frame house located at 839 N. Tennessee in Palestine, Texas. It has a large bay window on the left side of the house and Queen Ann-style embellishments along the roofline and the porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth9427/
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