Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 325, Ed. 1 Monday, April 18, 1938

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SWEETWATER REPORTER, SWEETWATER, TEXAS
Of Rising Star Wins Annual Qolf Tourname
Large Gallery
Thrilled When
Jones Rallies
Biff Spring Golfer
Almost Connects In
Story Book Finish
?
Sweetwater's second a* nuai
invitation golf tournament is
history today, and it really
made history. It not only drew
almost twice as many registra-
tions as the first event, but
wht J. T. Hammett of Rising
Star took Doug Jones of Big
Spring one up in the finals to
win the 36-hole match, he top-
ped the list of West Texas' out-
standing golfers that drew the
eyes of golfdom for their low
tournament scores.
It was a finish for the hooks,
with the popular Doug staging
a rally in the final 9 holes that
almost upset the favorite, as the
runner-up started the last lap
three down and came up to one
on the 35th hole. It was that
'ast hole that decided the match,
as Hammett halved it with a par
four to protect that one-hole
margin.
No. 8 Had Medicine
Just before the final 30th,
Hammett hit into the rough on
No. 8 for the second time in the
afternoon, and lost the one hole
gain by a bogy. The nla.y on
the fourth round was thrilling.
Hammett was three holes to the
good. Doug took No. 30 by a
birdie four, but lost 31 by a par
four. On the short 32nd Ham-
mett missed a two-foot putt
and dormie 1, making it 3 up
and -1 to go. Here Hammett got
the fairway again and Doug cut
1 off his lead. Hammett played
the last hole perfectly, match-
ing Doug's not so perfect par
four for the title.
The history of that third
round also is a thriller, with
Hammett leading two up after
besting Doug in the second
nine Sunday morning. They
halved No. 1 in 5, one over
par. Doug was on the green
in one on the 105-yard par 3
No. 2 and sank his putt for a
birdie two. Hammett was on
in two and parred the hole.
Both parred No. 3 at five
It was on that vexing No. 4
with the creek intervening that
Doug lost a hole, when he top-
ped his second stroke with the
wood and it landed in the H2-0.
Hammett used a No. 3 iron and
got a perfect lift to carry him
even with the green. He parred
the hole at five to regain his
two-lead. They took par three
on N'o. 5, with Hammett missing
a birdie by inches.
Overshot Frequently
No. (i is a par four hole. Jones
evidently was trying to match
Hammett's long drives, which
al times were phenomenal. He
overshot the green to get into
the rough, and lost the hole to
J. T. in five who sank a nice
putt to make it three-up. No.
7 they both took in par, It was
on No. 8. as previously noted,
that Hammett got into the
rough and lost to Doug. No. !J
Jones again overshot on the
second stroke, and lost the
hole in five when Hammett
parted it. J. T. drove more
than 300 yards on this one.
The match long will be re-
membered for two things: Those
long drives of the Rising Star
master, and the courage of Doug
Jones in refusing to concede,
and fighting all the way. Admir-
ing Hammett's power, there is
no doubt but that the gallery
favored the Big Spring contend-
er, who left not a twig in his
way to vindicate the support of
his followers.
One Stroke Difference
A post mortem of the finale
shows that there was only one
stroke between the stars, des-
pite Hammett's long drives. In
the morning round Hammett
bested Jones by only one stroke
total, 75 to 70, and in the af-
ternoon they were even at
79.
Here are the cards of the fin-
alists for the morning:
Par out .. 135 534 414—30
Hamm't out 644 554 454—11
Jones out . 535 535 145—3!)
Par in 435 534 444—30—72
Mammott in 425 534 fU l—31—75
Jones in .. .535 534 444—37—7G
Their afternoon cards:
Ham'et out 635 534 404—39
Jones out . 525 035 155—40
Ham'et in .435 545 404—40—79
Jones in ... 434 641 454—38—79
Other Plight yinnerit
Championship flight: James
Dixon, Crowell, defeated Obie
Bristow, Big Spring, for conso-
lation.
First flight: E. B. Dozier, Sr.,
Midland, champion. Grady Nor-
ris, Roscoe, runnerup. W. R.
Johnson, Rotan, consolation.
Second flight: J. S. Armour,
Trent, champion; Johnnie Brad-
shaw, No. 1 player on Sweet-
water high school team, run-
Golf Gallery
Highly Praised
E. B. Lovvorii, keeper of
the Lake Sweetwater golf
course, led those today who
complimented the large gal-
lery that followed the fin-
alist* Sunday. "The best I
ever saw," he declared.
Those who followed the
ni a t c h e k were respect-
ful both to the players, and
of the greens. They were
quiet and orderly when the
players teed off or putted,
and did not crowd the fair-
ways or the greens, or tram-
ple the latter. This was es-
pecially praiseworthy, in
that the fans were intense-
ly interested in the match
and anxious to miss no part
of the play.
Independents Hold Big Spring To Close Margin
Sweetwater In
nerup. J. B. Richards, Midland,
consolation.
Third flight: P. L. Ullom,
Sweetwater, champion; B o h
Crawford, Lubbock, runnerup:
and Fred Stewart, Sweetwater,
consolation.
Fourth flight: Roy Duckett,
Sweetwater, champion; L. C.
Curry, runnerup; and Harl W.
Pinkard, consolation.
Smartest Crack
The smartest crack made dur-
ing distribution of prizes was
by Bob Crawford. Offered
choice of prizes left after win-
ners of championship flight,
first and second flights, Craw-
ford picked up pair scales. "1
want these to see how much
weight 1 lost during the tourna-
ment."
E. B. Dozier, Sr.. Midland, se-
lected his prize and said "1
want to thank my opponents
for donating me this."
Melton Will lie Back
Amos Melton, commenting at
the conclusion of tournament
said: "This was. one of the
best golf tournaments I have
ever attended. You may rest as-
sured that it will rate with the
best held in the state this year.
I'll be back with you next year."
When prizes were distributed
Hammett was given choice of
the lot of SI50 assortment. He
selected a set of matched W liter
H.agen irons. Doug Jones, given
second choice, selected a set
of Walter Hagen woods. Jones
saitl it was exactly what he
wanted—since his irons were
good, but his woods terrible.
Local Women At
Easter Pajjeani
A group of Sweetwater wo-
men have returned from the
Wichita mountain Easter sun-
rise service that drew 150,000
spectators this year, breaking
a record for the annual atten-
dance.
'The pageant consisted ol' 301
tableaus, which began at 3:30
a. m.. Sunday lasting until sun- i
rise. More than 500 were in-
cluded in the cast.
"The Life of Christ. Ilisl
Teachings, and the Resurrec-
tion," was depicted in the ef-
fective scenes on the mountain 1
side. A loud speaking system |
made the music and hymns
more audible this year.
Another new feature was
the Easter cantatas which be- [
gan at 11:30 Saturday evening
lasting through until the begin-
ning of the service.
Those driving to the moun-
tain to see the spectacular per-
formance were Mrs. Elsie Rob-
inson and daughter, Elsie Joe,
Misses Grace Lackey, Pauline
Graves, LaFaye Stinchcomb,
and Edwina Walker.
— o
Dr. Wimberlys
Brother Dies
Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Wimberly
were called to Dallas Sunday on
account of the death of' Dr.
Wiinberly's brother, H. W.
Wimberly, 02, there Saturday.
Funeral services were held in
Dallas Monday.
Besides Dr. Wimberly, the
surviving brothers are C. Wim-
berly of Sweetwater, who is ill
at his home and unable to at-
tend the services; Dr. H. A. Wim-
berly of San Angelo; and Hayes
Wimberly in the state of Son-
ora, Mexico. The widow and
four children in Dallas also
survive, the children^teing Mrs.
R. F. Redman, Dickus, Buster
and E. L. Wimberly. Dr. Russell
Wimberly of Longwouth and
Fred Wimberly of Sweetwater
are nephews surviving.
H. W. Wimberly was a sales-
man for the Proctor-Gamble
company, traveling out of DaU
las.
o
During February, 1938, the
17 scheduled airlines of the
United States carried 73,563 pas-
sengers and flew 4,560,887 miles.
This is an increase of 15,565 pas-
sengers over February, 1937.
First Baseball
Tilt Looks Good
Individual Players
Need Coordination
To Make the Grade
Sweetwater, ladies and gen-
tlemen of the sports realm, has
the makings of a real indepen-
dent hardball team. That was
decisively demonstrated Sun-
day afternoon, when the gang
that has been practicing only
spasmodically for less than two
weeks, held the Big Spring team
of the West Texas-New Mexi-
co league that has been going
for two months, to a well-played
9 to 12 game.
Further, it uncovered a pitch-
er in Herman Greer who has
something on the ball, and
demonstrated that the mound
staff has a strong leader. Again,
it showed that the locals can
hit, and when they get a little
better organized, will have a
defensive club that will need
no apologies. A little too much
hurry to throw the ball before
they got it by the infield, a little
short on judging and hustling in
the outfield, and slight errors in
base-running, were the obvious
faults of the Sweetwater aggre-
gation that at times outplayed
the visitors.
First Ileal Test
But all Sweetwater's slight
rough spots arc pardonable, as
this was the first game they
ever played together. It makes
the Lubbock game here Wed
nesdav afternoon look like a big
league affair. Larue is an out-
standing performer behind' the
bat. Smith also can pitch. Carney
had a bad day at second but is
a good player normally. Kyle
and Witt are dangerous at the
plate. So is Larue. Mabry at
first is young but a hustler on
defense and offense, needing on-
ly a little more speed on the
bases. All in all. it is a club
with lots of individual class,
needing polish to make a team
worthy of strong support.
The box scores:
Sport Shots
BY WALT
Echoes of the District 5 ath-
letics contests ... In the feature
match of the senior boys singles,
when Joe Elrod of Sweetwater
took out Jack Kennedy of Ro-
tan, defending champion, there
was only 13 points separating
the players. This indicates the
closeness of the match. Even so,
Elrod won the last set 0-1, and
before they started only three
points separated the finalists.
Sweetwater entries did not
rank high in the scoring,
but uncovered some fine
material for next year.
Next year many of them
will be seniors, and will de-
vote lots of time to track
and field. Then Sweetwat-
er probably will be among
the leaders. Coach Adrian
Clark- had only two weeks
for the boys this year, and
they did well under the con-
ditions.
A feature of (lie meet was the
interest in tennis. A large see-
tion of the crowd watched the
boys matches, and more would
have watched the girls but for
the fact that they were held at
City Park away from the general
crowd. At that there was a
good audience for the girls.
When Sweetwater gets more
courts, promised for Newman
and Iteagan soon, tennis will
take a big jump. It already is
a leading sport in tin; "Recre-
ation Center of West Texas."
Just because the annual tour-
nament is concluded is no sign
golf interest is over. In fact, it
has merely been intensified. Fea-
tures are being planned for the
Lake Sweetwater course soon
that will keep the sport in the
limelight. Many lower flight
golfers were uncovered, and as
Amos Melton declares, the 90-
shooters are the backbone of a
tournament. Sweetwater is defi-
nitely ou the golf map of Texas,
Big Spring
AI5
It
II
i;
Donicea, lb
5

Q
. )
0
Stone, 3b
5
0
0
o
P. Joiner, ss .
5
J

■1
Anderson. If
5
1
0
0
H. Joiner. 3b .
0
0
0
Britton, cf
1
1
2
0
O'Brien, rf
5
1
0
0
Bcrent. c
2
1
0
Soddan. p
•>
1
0
0
Trantum, p
0
0
(1
0
Totals
12
2
!)
4
Sweet water
A B
It
II
K
1). Hanna. ss . .
5
0
0
1
Witt, cf
. 5
1
1
0
Hammonds. If
5
1
1
1
Larue, c .
5
2
•)
0
Kyle, rf
2
'>
0
Carney, 2b
1
1
II
1
Bruce, 2b .
1
0
0
0
Howe. 3b
1
1
0
Mabry, lb
r>
1
1
0
Smith, p .
•>
(1
11
0
Creer. p
•j
0
I
0
Totals
i \
0
!l
3
Score by innin
rs-
Big Spring . .
201
o:*2
022—
12
Sweetwater
000
231
003—
0
o

This probably is the last
mention of the ill-fated Pitts-
burgh Pirate- Chicago White
Sox game that the weather
postponed recently. Those
local fans who still hold
tickets are advised that
Tuesday noon is the dead-
line for refund of money at
the BCD office. The books
must be closed, and this
deadline has been set.
We get disgruntled at the
West Texas weather at times.
Itul il was real sporting the
past weekend. It permitted the
District .1 meet, postponed a
week, to be run off with splen-
did weather. Then it held off
its Sunday blast until the golf
finals were completed, and (lie
baseball game was concluded.
Not so bad at that, even though
a game between two colored
teams scheduled Sunday after-
noon was nipped in the bud.
The farmers got their rain, the
sportsmen' got their game. What
could be finer?
—o
Fifth Annual
Rodeo Series
Opens Saturday
Merkel Merchants to
Present Six Free
Rodeos During Summer
MERKEL — The first of
the series of six free rodeos
sponsored by the Merchants
Trade Extension association of
Merkel for the 1938 summer
season is scheduled at 2 p. m.
next Saturday. Dates of oth-
er shows to follow are: May 7.
-May 21, June 14, June 18 ind
July 2.
This is the fifth summer that
the merchants' of Merkel have
sponsored a series of free 10-
deos and in connection with an
Inter-Community Baseball lea-
gue. Opening game of the base-
hall season is set for Saturday,
April 30, but schedule of games
| has not yet been announced.
Next Saturday, opening ro-
deo day, a mammoth street pa-
I rade is being planned for 10 a.
j m.. which will be headed by
the Merkel Badger band and
in which all the merchants of
the city will enter decorated
cars or trucks. Other features
of the parade will include rodeo
contestants riding their mounts.
I women and girls, men and boys
on horseback, floats entered by
I clubs and organizations, base-
j ball players, boys and girls on
! bicycles and many other out-
standing features. Arrangements
' for the parade are in charge
I of E. O. Carson, chairman, with
I Roy Reid, chairman of new
I ideas committee, co-operating.
More (irandstaiiil Seats
Additional grandstand seats
I have been provided this year
j for rodeo patrons, including a
j section of numbered reserved
seats which may be purchased
I in advance at the two drug
S stores here or from W. O. Boncy,
1 chairman.
Contract for rode:) stock,
awarded again this year to Ho-
mer Patterson, provides for 15
Brahma steers, two bulldogging
steers, 20 cows and the same
number of calves, with four
bucking horses and two assoc-
iation saddles. Still another
event will feature bull-riding.
Special Prizes Offered
Besides day money, special
prizes of $25 in each of three
events, calf roping, cow milk-
ing and boys calf roping, will be
awarded to the contestant mak-
ing the best average during the
series of shows, but to be eligi-
ble for these seasonal prizes
contestants must participate in
at least five shows including
the last show of the season. No
contestant is eligible to receive
more than one seasonal prize.
\Y. W. Haynes Is chairman of
the rodeo committee, which in-
cludes Bob Malone. Mark Ma-
lone, John R. Collins, Fred A.
Baker, T. C. Jinkens, Jake
Massey and Cramer Reynolds.
Booth Warren is 1938 president
of the Merchants Trade Exten-
sion association.
Magnolia-Medicos Start
Workouts For Softball
Dr. R. O. Peters and Rig
Edwards, co-managers of the
Magnolia-Medicos which took
the city Softball championship
last year, have jumped into
first place with initial practice
scheduled for 0:30 o'clock Tues-
day afternoon at City Park.
This is the first team to get
started for the 1938 season, and
both Peters and Edwards de-
clare they are out for the pen-
nant again this year.
Rosier Announced
A roster of 20 players to
out for the team has been an-
nounced. These include Glenn
Webb, Arlie Greer, Bill Hunt.
H. D. Smith, Foster Miller,
John Clary, Josh and Lloyd Bil-
lings. Pop Stroble, D. B. Kear-
ney, Mack Johnson, Jim Larue.
Dick Howe, J. D. Mabry, B. F.
Weems, C. V. Carney, Homer
Lemburg. Zollie Steakley, Jr..
Alvis Mundy and Dick Man-
ila.
This team will be challenged
by five others starting May 2.
They are Sunbeam, Internation-
al. Recreation club, Robv and
«
Gulf. Six teams also will com-
pete in the girls division, in-
cluding two from Sweetwater,
and one each from Busby, Black-
well. Roscoe and Divide.
George Thompson
Scores An Eagle.
George M. Thompson, one
of Sweetwater's good golf-
ers who succumbed to the
fast company of the tourna-
ment, scored an eagle when
he made the speech and
presentation of prizes, prais-
ing the entire committees
and those who worked hard
to make the meet a suc-
cess.
Mayor Ben Roberts was
present, but declared he will
not take over the job offi-
cially until the retiring may-
or. Luther M. Watson, turns
over his 17 speeches to the
new official. When informed
that the last 10 Watson uses
are duplicates of the No. 1,
the new mayor declared he
hasn't received the script of
the first one.
Watson took a big part in
the tournament prepara-
tions. besides being the
daddy of the tourney sur-
prise, another good entry
and playing himself, as
well as being closely related
to some very interested gal-.
Jervites.
Mrs. Derri
Leaves Host
Mrs. Mary Derryber
cal patient, was disB
urday afternoon from
water Hospital.
Mrs. J. H. Forgay and
were moved to Brownwood
urday afternoon; Raymond
Sparks, a medical patient was
dismissed; Mrs. S. H. Wright,
surgical patient, was moved out
Saturday.
H. J. George. Millie Joe Dick-
son, and Mrs. C. T. Martin were
dismissed Sunday.
o
Family Finally
Lets Son Graduate
AUSTIN — (UP) — Martin
Grossman Ettlinger's father
and mother at last have decid-
ed you can't keep a good stu-
dent down. He will be permitted
to graduate from Austin high
school this year, age 12V4.
He could have graduated two
years ago but his parents thou-
ght. him too young. Now he has
taken every possible course of-
fered in the school. He will en-
ter the University of Texas
next fall and at the same time
wear hi.-, first long pants.
Already he is well known
about the campus. His father,
Il.vman Joseph Ettlinger, is pro-
fessor of pure mathematics at
tin University of Texas and
coaches football candidates in
spring practice.
—-—o
The new kite balloons, to be
used for observation purposes
during a war. are equipped with
a detachable car with an engine.
Two men are in the car, of
whom one is a pilot.
|H
■ '1
In
Spring Tonic for
your Automobilef
I -Correct grade of heat ,
Sl-«'mmer iWobi.oi, for i'..!'!!*'"8
2~Jough Mobil Gear
transmission
your motor
Oil for your
3
4
*«esh Mob" Gea' Off
differential
for
your
re-
sist headwater and °haS5'S *°
water and pressure
—Powerful, anti-knock (V-oh ,
better summer mifea^e SaS
fi—fWohal .
Ne«[ro Minstrel
At Hii'h School
c
A "Negro Minstrel" will be
presented by the Dramatics
club in the Newman high school
auditorium at the assembly per-
iod at 10 o'clock Tuesday morn-
ing for the purpose of raising
funds to purchase a new cyclo-
rama curtain for the high school
stage.
Songs, dances, and jokes fea-
ture the one-hour program. Hub-
ert Pollard, interlocutor, will
ciuestion "Hanibone" Dodson,
"Cornpone" May, "Stinky"
Stinchcomb. "James" Beall,
"Fingers" Nuckols, "Riehy" Blan-
cett, and "Hal" .lobe. Black-fac-
ed songsters include Jack Fav-
er, Jolmie Rradshaw, Norman
Shafer, and Floyd Stamps. Con-
rad Crowe will dance a number
in typical Bill Robinson style.
By this presentation, the
school hopes to start a move-
ment which will bring about
gathering of other funds nec-
essary before the actual pur-
chase of the curtain.
More than $200 will be need-
ed. The aim of the Dramatics
club members is to secure
enough funds by the beginning
of the next school year for the
curtain.
School patrons are invited to
attend this performance.
The performance is arranged
by Miss Sara Wheat, director
of speech, and Mrs. Frank Pos-
ey, director of the glee club.
Tech Students j
Visit Parents
K'tig Irwin Glass and Toinj
Pat Glass, students in Texas
Technological college. Lubbock,
spent the Easter vacation in
Sweetwater with their parents.
Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Glass.
Tom Pat, student in the com-
mercial art department, return-
ed to Lubbock today to resume
his duties. King Irwin, who is
specializing in chemical engin-
eering. left for Dallas where he
joined the chemical engineering
students on a field trip to Dallas
and Fort Worth industrial
plants.
The class is to attend, later
in the week,, the annual con-
vention of the American Che-
mical society, meeting in Fort
Worth. Following the meeting,
the students will return to Lub-
bock to resume their work.
o
Art Exhibit At
Jno. Lewis School
The John R. Lewis school is
sponsoring the showing today
and tomorrow of the work of
outstanding artists in a display
from 3:30 to 1:30 each afternoon.
The exhibit is composed of
150 reproductions of master-
pieces of artists, including land-
scapes. still life, scenes and
famous madonnas and other
characters.
According to M. D. Mauldin,
principal, the display is instruc-
tive and well worth while for
everyone to visit.
Trade Trippers To
Visit City Tuesday
Ft. Worth trade trippers on
their annual tour of West Texas
will make Sweetwater Tuesday,
their first day out. They will
arrive over special Texas &
Pacific train from Abilene at
9:30 o'clock tomorrow morning,
and will remain here until 10:35
o'clock, a -Id-minute stop.
Arrangements are being made
under the direction of the BCD
to greet the visitors at the
train, and escort them to the
courthouse. A meeting is plan-
ned for the county court room
when the visitors will mingle
with the Sweetwater business
men in a hand-shaking session.
iTIie TCU band and other fea-
tures with the Fort Worth tour
will stage a program.
one to
7 'nspect and
battery
jour
U00F
a
4
Change Now to Summer Grade
B-Sura-27
Copyright. 1938. Magnolia Petroleum Co
R FRIENDLY MAGN
Now is the time
to buy that —
HAT
a. tw
5.00
Values
MAN SHOP
Whitten and Simmons
Doscher Bldg.
THESE SMILING MAGNOLIA DEALERS WILL BE PLEASED TO SERVE YOU.
ROBY LONGWORTH
« .. ,u™c UI.DV||<P wtatiov T- C. TOLER SERVICE STATION
W. il. BATES SERVILE STATION PVLWA
DAL PASO SERVICE STATION HILL STORE
SWEETWATER
II. II. KIRKI'ATKICK FAVER-WILLIS SERVICE STATION
411 E. Bdwy. 300 W. Bdwv.
HILLTOP SERVICE STATION
West Bdwy. BILL HENDRICKS SERVICE STA.
W. E. COPELAND SERVICE STA. 901 Lamar
W. R. COMBS*SERVICE STA. H. W. HAWKINS GRO. AND. SER. STA.
701 W. Bdwy. 555 E. 12th
RIGDON EDWARDS, AGENT
For Magnolia Petroleum Co.
'I
!

. Sweetwater Reporter (Sweetwater, Tex.), Vol. 40, No. 325, Ed. 1 Monday, April 18, 1938. Sweetwater, Texas. The Portal to Texas History. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth290339/. Accessed September 3, 2015.