Boyce Ditto Public Library - 1,381 Matching Results

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[Two Old-Time Stores]

Description: This picture appears to show two stores that stand cheek-by-jowl. A saddlery on the far left shares space with a furniture storethat also sold cofins. The sign over the stores combines their functions in a way that would--under other circumstances--seem comical. The building itself was located at the corner of SE 1st, and South Oak Streets. A note on the photograph states that it was south of the MARTIN BUILDING. It was once the McBrayer-Armstrong Grocery, then later the Nash Hardware store. The location of Lattner eventually became the Buy-Rite store [116 South Oak Avenue, at the corner of SE 1st Street, until some time in the early 1980's]. The road is unpaved, there is no evidence of lighting--except for the lamp mounted on a post at the front of the building. The horse-drawn hearse (without its horse or plumes) suggests that although it was in front of the stores, it was not at the time in use. The picture, therefore, dates from the end of the 19th century--or the earliest 20th century.
Date: unknown

Colonial Hotel

Description: The Colonial Hotel at 115 W. Hubbard Street was built by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, and its name was changed to The Damron Hotel. The popular hotel burned down December 22, 1975 along with several other adjoining businesses.
Date: unknown

Mineral Wells Hardware

Description: The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...."
Date: unknown

[An Early View of Mesquite Street]

Description: This picture shows the D.M. Howard Block, on the lower end of Mesquite Street [2011], the intersection of Hubbard and SE 1st streets), facing west. The principal D.M. Howard building (farthest to the left in the photograph) survived to house various furniture establishments until 1975, when it was demolished. The three subsidiary buildings had been removed earlier. A legend on the base of the original photograph reads: "LOWER END OF MESQUITE STREET--Photo by McClure". Please note the absence of automobiles, the complete lack of paving, and the large traveling-bonnet worn by the lady in the foreground. The telegraph pole in the foreground appears to have been hand-hewn. The unpaved road supplies corroborating evidence that the photograph was taken before 1914. The identity of McClure, however, remains unknown. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 122.
Date: unknown

[The Demolition of the Convention Hall, 5 of 5]

Description: The Convention Hall met its end in 1979--after forty-five years of use. The exact location of this photograph in relation to the interior of the convention hall remains unknown. The picture shows two Roman arches, which must have been stress-relieving as well as serving as portals of access to various parts of the basement. The ends of two girders, which must have helped support the floor above them, are clearly visible above the nearer arch.
Date: unknown

City Meat Market

Description: The City Meat Market was located south of the Oxford Hotel. It faced SE 1st Street, where the entrance to the First National (Bank?) was located. Please observe the horse-drawn wagon at the right of the photograph. Modern [2016] viewers might be appalled at the sight of sides of meat hanging in the open air; but when this photograph was taken, it was standard procedure. The gentleman holding the carcasses of poultry probably does so only for the sake of the picture. The clean aprons of all the men associated with the store were probably also donned only for the picture. Otherwise, they would be heavily blood-stained. This building later housed Roger's Army Store. Information about it was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 121.
Date: unknown

The Crazy Well Water Company

Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. Recto describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Date: 1920?

Dry Goods--W.H.H.Hightower

Description: This picture shows what is conjectured to be a business from either the latest nineteenth, or the earliest twentieth centuries. There appears to be no display window nor door to it, only two posts to hold up the story above. The second story appears to be a clapboard false-front, as the windows and balconet seem only to be painted. Three men stand stiffly inside, one of them by what appears to be a display of straw hats--which perhaps dates the picture to the end of the nineteenth or beginning of the twentieth century. The second story bears the legend DRY GOODS/ BOOTS SHOES HATS &c. GENTS FURNISHING DRESS GOODS &c. W.H. HIGHTOWER. Three flags appear to adorn the front. A holograph on the back reads: "W.H. Hightower Grandfather of Mrs. Lyday & Grady & Rayford Hightower merchant from Georgia first settled in Johnson Co. near Cleburne located near Lattners [sic]"
Date: unknown

A Label of Mineral Water

Description: Shown here is a fairly modern label from a bottle of (concentrated) mineral water. Unlike its earlier representations, it makes no promise of curing disease. Instead, the label gives instructions on how to dilute the water, when to take it--and a warning when not to imbibe.
Date: unknown

The Thatch

Description: This photograph presents a conundrum. Advertising copy from around the picture relates that The Thatch was operated by Mrs. W. G. Wright. The building was said to be located "Within one block of the famous Gibson and Sangcura pavilions" (the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue and the 800 block of NW 2nd Avenue, respectively). Polk's Directory for 1909 fails to record The Thatch, or Mrs. Wright, as also fail the directories for 1920, 1924, and 1927. No mention of the Thatch appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time was in Mineral Wells...." The unpaved roads in front of the hotel suggest that the picture was taken before 1914. Copy around the picture (not visible here) remark that the building was "Erected two years ago", but no firm date may be deduced from that information.
Date: unknown

[An Unknown Boarding House]

Description: A large house (or possibly a hotel) is shown here. The original photograph is not in good condition. A black man (in shirtsleeves) may be seen on the first floor, next to a seated black lady. Two black(?) men, more formally dressed, stand on the second floor. There is no indication of the identity of the building. The presumed street in the front does not appear to be paved.
Date: unknown

Howard's Hardware Store 1903

Description: A printed legend on the top of the photograph reads: "Howard Hardward [sic] 1903" Please note the crowded aisles of miscellaneous articles. Also, please notice the two counters (equipped with clerks in shirt-sleeves) and the bridge above and between them that contains further articles. A colophon at the bottom of the picture indicates that "Dan W. Evans, Photo. of Mineral Wells" took the picture.
Date: unknown

The Davis Wells; The Davis Baths

Description: Pictured here is a semi-ornate brick building (with a socle presumably of stone), advertising the Davis Wells and the Davis Baths. This enterprise is not listed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." The picture appears to have been excerpted from a larger photograph, as the legend "Davis Baths" (not visible in the picture) appears on the negative. Polk's Directory for 1920 lists "Davis Mineral Baths" (proprietor, Dr. Eldred A.--the "A" stands for "Albany"--Davis) at "210 1/2 N. Oak Avenue." The business cannot be found in the 1909 or 1914 Polk's Directories. However, the 1914 Polk's Directory shows a Dr. Davis as living at 514 East Throckmorton [presently, in 2014, NE 1st Street] with his wife, Helen. The name of the bath house was changed to the "Buck Head" (or "Buckhead", as some sources have it) at some as yet unknown date.
Date: 1920?

Crazy Water

Description: Shown here is a label for Crazy Water, characterizing is as a "Natural, Saline, Alkaline Mineral Water--a Mild Laxative and Diuretic." The label continues with directions concerning the proper dosage. A cautious note suggests that the prospective drinker consult with a physician in cases of doubt of the required amount of water to take.
Date: unknown

The Methodist-Episcopal Church

Description: The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built at 301 NE 1st Street in 1898. The larger structure shown here resulted from expansion of the original frame structure and the addition of brick to the exterior in 1903. This church was later torn down to make room for the larger First Methodist Church, which still [2007] occupies this site. This picture is a portion of a collage that shows several church buildings.
Date: unknown