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Border Fence

Description: Section of bollard-style pedestrian border fence in Brownsville, TX. Erected by U.S. Homeland security in the late 2000s as part of the "Secure Fence Act of 2006."
Date: June 27, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Palmito Hill Battlefield Memorial

Description: Southward facing panoramic photograph of Palmito Hill Battlefield, the last land battle of the American Civil War on May 12-13, 1865. As viewed from the interpretive platform of the Historic Landmark near Boca Chica Blvd. and Palmito Hill Rd.
Date: June 27, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Cristo de los Pescadores

Description: Photograph of statue entitled, "Cristo de los Pescadores" in Isla Blanca Park on South Padre Island north west of the Jetties. Text of marker reads: "Father: Receive the Souls of these brave fishermen who sailed through this pass and never returned. Builders of this Statue: Amada de la Lastra Captain Joe Gayman Father Joseph O'Brien Bob Cornelison Manuel Hinojosa"
Date: June 26, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
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Statue of Padre José Nicolás Ballí

Description: Statue of Padre J. Nicolas Balli Located on South Padre Island. Historical Marker on base reads: "Padre Island, off the South Texas coast, is named for Padre Jose Nicolas Balli (177?-1829), whose family migrated from Spain in 1569 and became large landowners in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. In 1800 Balli applied to King Charles IV of Spain for 11 1/2 leagues of land on the island, and in 1804 started its first settlement, Rancho Santa Cruz. Padre Balli served as collector of finances for all the churches in the Rio Grande Valley and founded the first mission in present Cameron County. Padre Balli's ministry was a great influence on the lives of early South Texas settlers."
Date: June 26, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: Battle of Palmito Ranch

Description: Photograph of historical marker entitled: "Battle of Palmito Ranch." Text reads: "The last land engagement of the Civil War was fought near this site on May 12-13, 1865, thirty-four days after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox. Col. Theodore H. Barrett commanded Federal troops on Brazos Island 12 miles to the east. The Confederates occupied Fort Brown 12 miles to the west, commanded by Gen. James E. Slaughter and Col. John S. (Rip) Ford, whose troops had captured Fort Brown from the Federals in 1864. Ordered to recapture the fort, Lt. Col. David Branson and 300 men advanced from Brazos Island. They won a skirmish with Confederate pickets on May 12. Barrett reinforced Branson's troops with 200 men on May 13 and renewed the march to Fort Brown. Confederate cavalry held the Federals in check until Ford arrived with reinforcements that afternoon. Ford's artillery advanced and fired on the northern end of the Federal line while the cavalry charged. The Confederate right charged the southern end of the Federal line and captured part of the Union infantry. Barrett ordered a retreat toward the U.S. position on Brazos Island. While the Confederates reported no fatalities in the Battle of Palmito Ranch, the Union forces reported four officers and 111 men killed, wounded or missing." Dated: 1966, 1990.
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: Last Battle of the Civil War

Description: Photograph of a historical marker commemorating the last battle of the Civil War. The text reads: "At This Site -- The Last Battle of the Civil War, Known as Palmito Hill, was Fought by Confederate Troops Under Colonel John S. (Rip) Ford and Union Forces on May 13, 1865, 34 Days After Lee's Surrender at Appomatox -- Erected by the State of Texas -- 1936"
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: Site of Camp Belknap

Description: Photograph of Historical Marker entitled: "Site of Camp Belknap." Text reads: "In May 1846 when war was declared against Mexico, the U.S. Congress authorized the raising of 50,000 volunteer troops to supplement the regular U.S. Army. General Zachary Taylor was quickly inundated with volunteer soldiers arriving at Brazos Santiago, and was forced to place them in temporary encampments. Camp Belknap, located on this site, was established in the summer of 1846. The camp was located on a long narrow rise of land, measuring about 2 miles in length and one-half mile at its widest point. It was the first high ground encountered after leaving the Gulf Coast. Thought to be the largest encampment for volunteer soldiers, troop estimates total 7,000-8,000 men including several regiments from eight states. Soldiers suffered exposure to the elements, unsanitary living conditions, overcrowding, biting insects, thorny plants, and disease. Many died a premature death, often resulting in one two two funerals daily. No enemy attacks took place despite one false alarm. During August and September most of the volunteers were moved upriver either to camps nearer Matamoros, or further to Camargo. The camp was completely empty by December 1846." Marker is dated 1996 in the lower-right corner.
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Point Isabel Coast Guard Building on South Padre Island

Description: Southward facing photograph of the 1923 Point Isabel Coast Guard Building located on South Padre Island. A small historical marker on the opposite side reads: "The Federal Government has operated a coastal installation at Point Isabel since 1852. This structure is the third permanent building erected here, one of a line of nine stations established along the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to the Texas-Mexico border. Originally consisting of a main floor, attic, and lookout tower, all elevated off the ground on wood and concrete pilings, the structure served as barracks and headquarters for the U.S. Coast Guard unit that patrolled the coastline and conducted sea rescues. (1988)"
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info: